CONFERENCE AGENDA

MONDAY, MAY 22, 2023

ON-DEMAND FRIDAY, JUNE 2 - SEPT. 2,
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  • REGISTRATION, EXHIBITS & CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST – 7:00 –   8:00

  • INTRODUCTIONS & WELCOME – 8:00 –   9:15

    Tracy Gruber, Executive Director, Utah Department of Health & Human Services

  • Behavioral health impacts from critical incidents, emergencies and large-scale disasters are often overshadowed by other types of community concerns during the recovery from the event, and often misunderstood by responding agencies as well as the community members who have experienced them. This presentation will explore some of the typical short- and long- term behavioral health challenges and outcomes related to disasters, and provide evidence-based best practices for practical resilience-oriented community recovery. Current neuroscience and clinical techniques will be discussed in the context of recovery-oriented communication, de-escalation, and accessible behavioral health supports for children, youth, and adults.

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    1) Synopsize the potential short- and long-term effects of mass disasters as well as various types of traumas in adults of all developmental ages and stages; and,

    2) Address these issues in treatment plans for individuals who have experienced trauma.

  • EXHIBITS & BREAK – 9:15 –  9:30

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 9:30 – 10:45  (1.25 Each)

  • This presentation outlines the role criminal violence plays in our communities. From gangs, to mental health, to multigenerational familial influences, we will dissect the challenges facing justice-involved individuals and their families. We will take a look at how prison violence colors behavioral programs in institutions as well as community support groups. We will discuss the use of violence as a tool by organized crime groups to influence individuals, public opinion and governmental offices. And we will examine the ever shifting tide of violence flowing from the community to correctional facilities and back into the community.

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1)  Trace the impacts violent criminal acts have in the daily lives of victims, justice-involved individuals, family members, the general public, as well as government entities; and,

    2) Outline the challenges criminal violence causes in the successful rehabilitation and/or reentry of individuals back into our communities and identify strategies to influence more successful outcomes individually and collectively.

  • A ‘COUPLE’ THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS 1

    David Fawcett, PhD, LMFT, RPT-S; Elizabeth B. Fawcett, PhD, LMFT

    This presentation will describe and demonstrate experiential, interactive, and playful approaches, techniques, and interventions for working with children, teens, adults, couples, and families. We will use art, crafts, toys, sand, and other playful tools. Attendees will gain practical experiential skills to use during therapy sessions. This presentation is appropriate for all levels, from beginners to advanced practitioners.

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will leave able to:

    1) Describe specific experiential interventions for working with clients. Trace the origins of art therapy practices and explain how it’s mechanisms work on the mind, body, and spirit and the commonly experienced outcomes; and

    2) Describe their own experience from this session and explore how this modality can be used to enhance ‘clinical’ journeys with adults as well as youth.

  • This lecture will focus on guidelines for assessing a mother’s mental health status perinatal and postpartum – including possible substance use. We will review how mental health status affects ability to care for self and how providers can take appropriate intervention measures to ensure everyone’s safety and mental health and work collaboratively to this end with the other providers.

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will leave able to:

    1) Provide a differential diagnosis and assess a mother’s mental health status perinatal and postpartum – including but not limited to possible substance use; and

    2) Evaluate a pregnant individual’s mental health status affect ability to care for self and take appropriate intervention measures to ensure everyone’s safety and mental health and work collaboratively to this end with the other providers.

  • Are you a professional who works with anxiety every day, but some of your clients report your typical treatment isn’t working for them? Do you find yourself frustrated what your clients suffering with more intensive anxiety symptoms are often struggling to grasp basic therapeutic concepts or lack insight? This presentation is primarily for those who have “tried everything” with their clients who are struggling with sever symptoms of anxiety and are feeling discouraged or at a loss for their more difficult treatment refractory clients. It is recommended those who attend this session have at least an intermediate level of skill as we will cover different complicated case studies which incorporates in-depth medical/mental health comorbidities which often impact these difficult cases.

    After the conclusion of this breakout session, attendees will be able to:

    1) Participants will be able to understand why treatment interventions for mild anxiety symptoms are ineffective for clients struggling with sever cases of anxiety. They will also be provided with different methods and interventions typically used for those struggling with more severe and treatment refractory symptoms of anxiety; and

    2)Participants will be able to identify complex medical and mental health comorbidities which intensify symptoms for clients with sever anxiety symptoms, along with treatment recommendations for these difficult cases.

  • WHERE TO START WITH TREATING METHAMPHETAMINE USE DISORDER

    Justin Alves, MSN, FNP-BC, ACRN, CARN, CNE     (Supported by the Opioid Response Network)

    Methamphetamine use disorder is a growing problem in an epidemic of multiple substance use disorders. The presentation will have helpful information to understand the neurobiology of methamphetamine use and addiction as well as information on the available evidence-based treatments for methamphetamine use disorder. The presentation will review strategies for managing overamping as well as practical information for the provider engaging patients in a harm reduction framework to promote safety and wellness. Other special topics including trauma-informed care approaches and chemsex will be reviewed.

    Once participants have attended this session, they will be able to:

    1) Describe the role of dopamine in the development of a methamphetamine use disorder. Participants will also be able to identify at least 2 populations disproportionately affected by methamphetamine use disorder; then

    2) Recognize at least 3 physical and 3 psychological signs of psychostimulant overdose also known as overamping. Participants will also be able to identify at least 1 evidence-based behavioral health intervention and 1 evidence-informed pharmacotherapy treatment for methamphetamine use disorder.

  • This presentation will introduce the Health Disparities in Utah’s Public Mental Health and Substance Use Treatment Systems Needs Assessment’s findings & recommendations, and will provide skills and tools to put into practice that are racially and ethnically responsive. The objective is to engage participants in a practice-based approach that differs from standardized practices in a field that has historically excluded Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC).

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1)  Understand Utah’s needs assessment findings and recommendations; How may applying recommendations into practice look like? Such as how to navigate language barriers, challenging implicit biases, proving an inclusive environment, and factors that may be preventing your practice from providing a racially and ethically responsive care; then,

    2) Discuss culturally-grounded practices from a  trauma-informed lens to help increase and sustain treatment consent, inclusion, and success with BIPOC* patients. *Black, Indigenous, People of Color (BIPOC).

  • Music gives us a unique opportunity to connect with others, express emotions, and shift mood in helpful ways. This presentation will explore various ways to use music in mental health treatment, including songwriting, relaxation, improvisation, lyric analysis, and song re-creation. The impact of these interventions on mental health and methods for incorporation will also be discussed.

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1)  Trace the origins of music therapy and related practices and explain how it’s mechanisms work on the mind, body, and spirit and the commonly experienced outcomes; and,

    2) Describe their own experience from this session and explore how the concepts of music therapy can be used to enhance ‘clinical’ journeys.

  • DISASTER COUNSELOR CRISIS TRACK (Available in-person only)

    Kira Mauseth, PhD; Tona McGuire, PhD

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) Diagram the comprehensive emergency management system from a planning and policy perspective; and

    2)Describe the role of Health Support Team intervention into the tiered system of intervention and disaster recovery.

  • EXHIBITS & BREAK – 10:45 – 11:00

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 11:00 – 12:15 (1.25 Each)

  • Once attendees have heard this session, they will be able to:

    1)  Present some of the special circumstances and considerations which must be included when working with LGBTQ+ individuals, their partners, and/or families; and,

    2) Translate these considerations into practice and include approaches / interventions which appropriately and ethically address them.

  • Take Away Skills: This fast-paced, interactive workshop will examine the negative effects of poverty and marginalization and provide interventions to facilitate healing in our clients and ourselves. We will first establish a shared, working definition of terms like trauma, marginalization, and “transgenerational”. We will then review the physical and psychological short and long-term impacts of transgenerational trauma among various populations (American Indian/Alaska Native, African American, and Latinx/Hispanic Communities) as well as issues that must be assessed and addressed in treatment. We will explore current research about the ways chronic negative emotion states impact health and affect subsequent generations as well as how health disparities both create and result from trauma. We will also examine strength, resilience and protective cultural factors. Participants will come away with solid skills, evidence-based strategies, and therapeutic interventions to implement accordingly as we work facilitate health and healing in our clients and our communities.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1)  Identify three ways health disparities disproportionately impact communities of color, Name four physical and psychological impacts of transgenerational trauma; and,

    2) Identify three evidence-based interventions/techniques to address and treat the signs and symptoms of transgenerational trauma.

  • This presentation will review the fundamental aspects of risk assessment for mentally ill patients through discussion of demographic and historical, as well as phenomenological  presentations that confer increased risk. Actuarial and structured professional judgment tools will be reviewed. Finally, strategic aspects to reduce the risk of violence towards providers will be covered in order to assure provider safety.

    Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to:

    1)  Conduct a risk assessment for potentially violent clients; and,

    2) Set-up an office space / therapeutic environment which enhances safety for the client and the clinician and includes intervention techniques and styles which lessen the likelihood of an ‘incident’ and protects both parties legally and ethically.

  • The presentation will discuss the connection between the Climate Crisis and deteriorating Mental Health. It will then discuss what is necessary for preventing and fixing damage from climate change and how those actions will save all life on the planet. It will all discuss components of happiness and why climate damage tends to decrease happiness and why fixing climate change will tend to increase happiness.

    Once participants have attended this session, they will be able to:

    1) Share the latest research on climate’s effects on mental health and overall wellness; and,

    2) Draw parallels between climate, human connections, physical and mental health, and the needs for happiness.

  • Once participants have attended this session, they will leave able to:

    1) Outline the emerging Medication-Assisted Treatments (MAT) currently being used and studied for treatment of substance use disorders, end-of-life care, and various mental health diagnoses such as anxiety and depression; and,
    2) Detail the specifics for each of these medications. This can include indications and contraindications for use, expected results, ‘red flags.’ From there present how the medical and non-medical treatment team members can best work together and adjust treatment as may be indicated

  • A ‘COUPLE’ MORE THERAPEUTIC INTERVENTIONS – 2

    David Fawcett, PhD, LMFT, RPT-S; Elizabeth B. Fawcett, PhD, LMFT

    This presentation will describe and demonstrate experiential, interactive, and playful approaches, techniques, and interventions for working with children, teens, adults, couples, and families. We will use art, crafts, toys, sand, and other playful tools. Attendees will gain practical experiential skills to use during therapy sessions. This presentation is appropriate for all levels, from beginners to advanced practitioners.

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will leave able to:

    1) Describe specific experiential interventions for working with clients. Trace the origins of art therapy practices and explain how it’s mechanisms work on the mind, body, and spirit and the commonly experienced outcomes; and

    2) Describe their own experience from this session and explore how this modality can be used to enhance ‘clinical’ journeys with adults as well as youth.

  • Self-transcendence has been cultivated by many spiritual traditions but is newer to Western psychology. According to research, self-transcendence leads to health benefits including improved mood, reduced pain and clinical symptomology. This presentation will provide perspectives on self-transcendence from the contexts of Buddhist psychology, mindfulness practices and Acceptance Commitment Therapy. Participants will learn and experience practices that promote self-transcendent states.

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    1)Increase knowledge of the concept of self-transcendence and the research on its health benefits; and,
    2)Increase experience with practices that promote self-transcendent states.

  • Discover chair yoga-based interventions that can help regulate the autonomic nervous system and learn how these interventions are used for effective outcomes for folks with trauma. Learn how ACE scores can effect your clients long term physical health, how to do safe body scans and the difference between trauma informed and trauma sensitive. Practitioners will experience cultivating mindful awareness of the connection between our body, mind, and breath through chair yoga. In addition, attendees will learn how to engage the parasympathetic nervous system through breath and how this process reduces the ongoing stress response induced by trauma. (All levels of practitioners welcome)

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:
    1)Trace the origins of yoga practices and explain how it’s mechanisms work on the mind, body, and spirit and the commonly experienced outcomes; and,
    2)Describe their own experience from this session and explore how this modality can be used to enhance ‘clinical’ journeys.

  • DISASTER COUNSELOR CRISIS TRACK (Available in-person only)

    Kira Mauseth, PhD; Tona McGuire, PhD

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) Diagram the comprehensive emergency management system from a planning and policy perspective; and

    2)Describe the role of Health Support Team intervention into the tiered system of intervention and disaster recovery.

  • LUNCHEON – 12:15 – 1:30

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 1:30 – 2:45  (1.25 Each)

  • Why do we human beings so often harm ourselves? How can we move towards more loving care for ourselves, each other and the eco-systems that support all life?

    Inclusively defined, most human beings engage in self-harm in many ways. On the macro level, for example, most of us continue to contribute to such global survival threats as climate change, species extinction, preparations for war, and pandemic illness. On the mezzo level, we may continue to commute in vehicles that poison our local air, earth, and water, and continue to ignore the growing inequalities of opportunity, safety, wealth and power that poison the mental health of our local communities. On the micro level, many of us may cut on our bodies, overeat, overwork, or poison our bodies with excessive alcohol and processed foods

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Assess an individual who has self-harmed, explore it’s etiology, and design a treatment plan to address the causes and the behavior; and,

    2) Provide a differential diagnosis with suicidality and address safety and behavioral management. Assess a local or global community that is self-harming and design a mezzo/macro level community mental health intervention plan.

  • Provide an overview of the basics of civil commitment law, including pink, blue, 48 hour emergency extension, and white sheets. Highlight and review recent changes to civil commitment law.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Define, by law and statute, civil commitment, involuntary holds, and other options for behavioral health providers in the field and in treatment settings.  This shall include, but not be limited to, criteria, procedures, legal precedents, resources, and legal recourses. The purpose and Philosophy of Civil Commitment; and

    2)Highlight similarities and differences between involuntary holds, and discuss how to utilize involuntary civil commitment options.

  • An appropriate and empathetic response following a suicide death is critical. In fact, it is said that good postvention IS suicide prevention. Postvention refers to activities that help individuals and communities cope with the emotional distress resulting from suicide and prevent additional trauma. Everyone must embark on postvention, including state and local governments, schools, faith communities, families, friends, and affinity groups. Carol will present the guiding principles of a postvention response, the resources to support community postvention, and how to respond after a suicide death in a way that promotes hope and healing.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Outline activities that help individuals and communities cope with the emotional distress resulting from a suicide in order to prevent additional trauma; and,

    2) Present the guiding principles of a postvention response, the resources to support individual and community postvention, and responses that promote hope and healing. This shall include, but not be limited to, language, media coverage, school, and individual practitioner techniques.

  • This workshop will identify the basics of polyamorous relationships and then dive into the deeper complexities of therapeutic systems work with individuals, couples, and polycules practicing ethical non-monogamy. Attachment theory as well as trauma informed care will provide the theoretical lenses through which the group will actively assess case studies, posit treatment options, and explore their own potential biases. Resources for further reading and education will be referenced.

    Once attendees have participated in this session, they will leave able to:

    1) Outline the basic vocabulary and foundational tenets of ethical non-monogamy and assess relationships wherein these practices exist; and,

    2) Apply therapeutic techniques based on attachment theory when working with these individuals. This shall include, but not be limited to exploration of trauma history and its impact on the individuals and their involvement in these practices while ethically and professionally putting aside any implicit bias or other moral judgements which may be held by the therapist.

  • In this session participants will learn to identify and understand the systems perspective for body image and eating disorders.
    • Learn to better recognize biases in mental health assessments.
    • Identify and name weight stigma.
    • Media influence on body image and eating disorders.
    • What is diet culture and fatphobia?
    • How to identify red flags and other risk factors in the assessment process.
    • Identify and recognize Treatment Approaches beyond CBT for assessing and treating body image and eating disorders in practice.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Trace some of the major systematic contributing factors, including weight stigma, media and fatphobia throughout history which contribute to body image issues and possible development of eating disorders. Recognize the ‘red flags’ associated with these conditions and conduct an accurate initial assessment in order to determine the course of treatment and/or referral needs; and,

    2) Identify treatment and assessment approaches beyond the CBT model for body image and eating disorders.

  • SOUL MEETS BODY: MULTIPLE APPROACHES TO EXPLORING SPIRITUALITY IN CARE SETTINGS

    Kevin Curtis, LCSW (Panel Coordinator);  Jerry Buie, LCSW;  John D. Cooper, BCCI; Spencer L. Cooper, MA

    Are religion and spirituality the same thing? Can you be spiritual if you are not religious? Can I talk about spirituality with clients in a care setting? How? This panel of experts from different backgrounds will answer these questions by sharing their approaches to this multifaceted topic. Through the process this panel’s aim is to demystify and normalize talking about what can be one of the most critical aspects of a person’s healing journey. Everyone is welcome.

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    1) Explore the ways spirituality can be assessed, discussed, and incorporated into behavioral health treatment; and,

    2)Give tools to individuals they can use in conjunction with the therapeutic path to deal with faith and/or existential crises, find life meaning and purpose, and find peace.

  • DISASTER COUNSELOR CRISIS TRACK (Available in-person only)

    Kira Mauseth, PhD; Tona McGuire, PhD

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) Diagram the comprehensive emergency management system from a planning and policy perspective; and

    2)Describe the role of Health Support Team intervention into the tiered system of intervention and disaster recovery.

  • Once attendees participated in this session, they will be able to:

    1) Trace the origins of meditation practices and explain how it’s mechanisms work on the mind, body, and spirit and the commonly experienced outcomes; and,

    2) Describe their own experience from this session and explore how this modality can be used to enhance ‘clinical’ journeys.

  • EXHIBITS & BREAK – 2:45 – 3:00

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 3:00 – 4:30 (1.5 Each)

  • Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is among the oldest and most effective treatments in psychiatry, but we are still learning how best to apply it. This presentation will provide an update on the ‘who’ and ‘what’ of ECT. We will review what conditions the FDA has approved for us of ECT (on-label indications) and touch on current off-label applications. The process of ECT will be illustrated with case presentations. Finally, we will summarize recent studies of clinical and demographic predictors which have informed who responds best to ECT. Practitioners of all levels will take away practical knowledge of how to identify good candidates for this unique intervention.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Outline the indications for use, contraindications, expected outcomes, potential risks, and other nuances of ECT to demonstrate decision making around the need to refer; and,

    2) Explain the process of ECT and its course in various patients and work with the interdisciplinary team throughout its course and post-ECT treatment.

  • Counseling on Access to Lethal Means (CALM) Training focuses on the “How” of suicide. Research has shown that reducing access to lethal means, putting time, space and distance between a person and lethal means, reduces their risk of suicide. Come find out more about the data and research that informs this approach as well as study and practice the techniques to engage patients and families in conversations to reduce suicide risk. Access to handouts for patients and families on CALM and Safe Storage.

    Once participants have attended this session, they will be able to:

    1) Explain the evidence base behind reducing access to lethal means, how it can prevent suicide and appropriately identify who can benefit from CALM. Learn and practice strategies to feel more comfortable speaking with patients, families, friends and loved ones about off-site and in-home safe storage for firearms, medications, and other identified lethal means; then,

    2) Develop a plan to reduce access to lethal means, including follow-up on the plan over time.

  • TRAUMA INFORMED CARE, WHEN EMDR IS NOT ENOUGH

    April L. Bennett, LMFT, CCTP, ART, IP-F

    Understand trauma, effective trauma treatment elements and intervention strategies

    Have you learned EMDR and still find difficulties in treating trauma or do not know what to do with clients? Have you been wanting EMDR training, to know how to work with trauma, and are not sure you want to make the investment in EMDR training? Do you want to hone some skills to serve trauma clients better? This workshop will cover a lot of material to assist in understanding and working with trauma, including complex trauma, dissociation, parts work, attachment injuries and the role families play in trauma and healing. You will come away with the template for exceptional trauma treatment, gain some skills and to understand more effective use of skills you already have and know where to turn for more resources.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to

    1) Outline best practices of trauma-informed care and evaluate their own practice (including staff, setting, etc.) for adherence to these principles and make necessary changes to be more compliant with these best practices; and,

    2) Assesses clients with trauma to design a treatment plan incorporating the most appropriate treatment modalities and be able to apply those interventions appropriately and evaluate their effectiveness for any needed adjustments.

  • Thousands of years have passed since it was first created, so why is acupuncture still being practiced today? What makes this healing technique an enduring part of medical care around the world, and increasingly, in the USA? Please join us to learn why acupuncture is still relevant and important today. We will trace the roots of acupuncture to its Chinese medicine origins, explore major theories om why acupuncture works, talk about basic principles of the medicine, and suggest how it can be used to support patients. There will the opportunity for participants to briefly receive acupuncture, if they are interested.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Trace the origins of acupuncture practices and explain how its mechanisms work on the mind, body, and spirit and the commonly experienced outcomes; and,

    2) Describe their own experience from this session and explore how this modality can be used to enhance ‘clinical’ journeys.

  • This presentation will focus on the latest evidence regarding the role of the gut microbiome and gut health as it relates to behavioral health diagnoses including substance use disorder. Through a combination of informational slides, case presentations and audience participation attendees will come away with knowledge of the importance of nutrition as one pillar of wellness in the treatment of patients with these diagnoses. Pre-conference self-reflection about the importance of nutrition, nutrition knowledge and current nutritional patterns will allow for participants to come into this discussion with insight regarding nutrition in their own life, to better understand how they might approach a discussion about this important treatment consideration with their own patients/clients. Participants will leave this session with a toolkit to assess an individual’s nutritional habits and their level of motivation for change, and simple interventions and recipes. Case reports will highlight the importance, simplicity of interventions and positive outcomes that can be obtained by integrating these interventions into patient/client encounters.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Report on the most recent research around nutrition and gut microbiota as they relate to overall wellness including mental health; then,

    2) Assess nutritional habits and intake of clients with a behavioral health diagnosis and provide them with education and develop a dietary plan with them to boost their gut health and the consequential impact on their behavioral health and overall wellness.

  • “I’m not sure what I believe anymore let alone what is ‘OK’ sexually…I’m stuck.” This is a common space for clients who find themselves going through a faith crisis/transition, sexual health distress, or both! As the clinician, you may see other methods are helping, but still feel stuck. The topics may differ from week to week, but the outcome still feels the same.
    It’s time to get you both out of the chair.

    All of our clients are sexual beings and engage in a sexual world that is confusing, ill-educated, and riddled with judgements. Individuals challenging powerful religious views can feel as though they don’t have a way to move forward. This training will walk you through the method of using movement in the office based on Dr. Gina Ogden’s work/research with the 4 Dimensional wheel. This includes the Spiritual, Emotional, Mental, and Physical approach from the Pachacutie Mesa in Peru. This training is open to all practitioners whether beginning, intermediate, or advanced.

    Clinicians will learn methods of using the 4-D wheel through the 4 core elements of the wheel, using client-chosen objects to enhance assessment/treatment tools, and learning from case studies. Through these methods, you can enhance how sexual health during faith transition can be explored, identified, and concretized.

    Time will be allotted at the end of the presentation for Q & A.

    Once participants have attended this session, they will be able to:

    1) Participants will be able to identify the 4 core elements of using the 4-Dimensional wheel; and,

    2) Participants will demonstrate competence in the introduction/use of objects in the therapeutic process.

  • Through a wellness-based approach, participants will learn the six most common traits of strong, resilient families: Appreciation, Commitment, Creative Coping, Time Together, and Spiritual Wellness. This fun, upbeat, and informative research-based presentation has been presented to a wide range of clinical settings (outpatient and inpatient mental health and substance abuse), community groups, church groups, correctional facilities, and professional populations. This presentation provides information and ideas that professionals can utilize in their own lives, with their clients, and in the community. This workshop has been an effective means of combating the stigma of mental health by exposing community members to a licensed mental health professional in a non-threatening, upbeat milieu.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Discuss the six most common traits of strong, resilient families with a brief introduction to the supporting research. Recall these traits as well as ways to practically apply them with clients; then,

    2) Discuss suggestions for teaching these traits to client families and using them in their agencies (i.e., integrating them into therapy, psychoeducation, group therapy, psychoeducational classes, etc.) Also, gain ideas for implementing these concepts in their own community (i.e., offering as a workshop as community outreach, prevention services, etc.).

  • DISASTER COUNSELOR CRISIS TRACK (Available in-person only)

    Kira Mauseth, PhD; Tona McGuire, PhD

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) Diagram the comprehensive emergency management system from a planning and policy perspective; and

    2)Describe the role of Health Support Team intervention into the tiered system of intervention and disaster recovery.

  • There has been a significant increase in adults seeking evaluation and treatment for suspected Autism Spectrum Disorders. Many of these adults have never been previously diagnosed with Autism. This presentation will explore the potential reasons for the increase in adults seeking services for Autism Spectrum Disorders. A review of best practices in the assessment and diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders in adults will be presented. Best practices in treatment will also be explored.

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    1) Identify “Gold Standard” tolls used when assessing adults with suspected Autism Spectrum Disorder; and,

    2) Author best practices that should be followed when assessing adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders. This includes best practices in treatment.

TUESDAY, MAY 23, 2023

  • CHECK-IN, EXHIBITS AND CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST – 7:30 – 8:00

  • INTRODUCTIONS & WELCOME – 8:05 – 9:00

    Jeremy Cottle, CEO, Provo Canyon Behavioral Hospital

  • Effective personal and professional resiliency skills are critical to managing challenges and bouncing forward, not just bouncing back, in the face of adversity. This presentation will share lessons learned selecting, training, and treating elite members of the military and federal government who face extremely difficult circumstances. Drawing on experiences from more than twenty years as an operational and clinical military psychologist, lessons on distress inoculation, performance enhancement, and efficient recovery will be shared. Case studies from hostage negotiation, survival training, and work in Iraq and Afghanistan will be utilized. Additionally, common barriers and methods to working more effectively with the first responder and military communities will be highlighted. As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    1) Understand the five pillars of resiliency and how these are trained and tested in the context of US military special operations and law enforcement; and,

    2) Apply the information gained to improve personal and professional resilience, and be confident in the application of new insights and skills in the treatment of members of these communities.

  • EXHIBITS & BREAK – 9:00 – 9:15

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 9:15 – 10:30 (1.25 Each)

  • “More than sad” is an AFSP program that teaches educators to recognize signs of mental health distress in students and refer them for help. The program covers mental health conditions, the warning signs of suicide, and steps they can take to get help for at-risk students. (beginning)

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    1) TBD; and,

    2) TBD

  • BULLYING & SOCIAL MEDIA – NOT JUST THE KIDS!

    Kevin Skinner, LMFT, CSAT-S, CPTT

    This presentation aims to provide a comprehensive examination of bullying, encompassing its underlying reasons, associated risk factors, and potential consequences. Additionally, the presentation will explore the similarities and differences between bullying experienced by youth and its adult counterparts.

    Moreover, the second part of the presentation will delve into the vast ecosystems of interventions available for bullying management and prevention across diverse populations and environments, including workplaces and schools. Attendees will gain insight into empirically-supported strategies for addressing bullying, as well as best practices for implementation and evaluation.

    Upon completion of the presentation, participants will possess a nuanced understanding of the multifaceted nature of bullying and the tools necessary for effective intervention and prevention.

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) TBD; and,

    2) TBD

  • CELEBRATING NEURODIVERSITY

    Jared Stewart, MEd, BCBA, LBA

    One of the most often overlooked aspects of diversity and inclusion is neurodiversity, and those of us with uniquely-wired brains often experience a lot of negativity, hardship, and even discrimination because of our neuro-minority status. And yet, studies show that there are measurable strengths associated with neurodiversities like ASD, ADHD, LD, and even Anxiety and Depression. Come join Autistic Self Advocate and Chair of the Utah Developmental Disabilities Council, Jared Stewart, as he combines his personal and professional experiences with current research findings to provide an entertaining and educational window on how to begin seeing autism and related conditions as more then just a list of challenges. Learn tips and tools on how to maximize potential and to CELEBRATE the unique strengths that often accompany our unique minds!

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    1)  Describe, from research and practical experiences, how individuals with common neurodiverse brains view the world and how they can adapt to use those differences as real strengths in the social and emotional realms; and,

    2) Author treatment plans for these individuals seeking treatment for behavioral health and/or physical disorders. This shall include approaches in hospital settings as well as outpatient settings.

  • The focus of this lecture will be to highlight how psychedelic agents have been used in behavioral health throughout history. As policies and public views towards psychedelics have changed over time, we will also look at the potential future of psychedelic medications in the field of behavioral health in Utah and throughout the world.

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) Trace the history of psychedelic agents in behavioral health from ancient times to future projections; and,

    2) Review the legislation – state, national, and international as well as practice guidelines around such agents.

  • As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) Define and describe the ‘levels of care’ and determine the appropriate level placement which will provide effective evidence-based / practice-based evidence of care for various clients in various stages of mental health and addiction paths; and,

    2) Determine the needs and corresponding placement options for individuals dealing with behavioral health issues and explain how to help clients most effectively with these transitions into placement and how to work with the involved providers.

  • In this presentation you will learn how to use spirituality as a tool for increasing client resilience and well-being. Research about how to practice ethical self-disclosure and how to manage clinician bias around religion and spirituality will be presented. Case examples about integrating religion and spirituality with clients will be provided. Interventions for clients experiencing faith crisis will be discussed, along with overview of original research conducted in 2022 about comparing and contrasting experiencing a faith crisis and experiencing a perinatal mood and anxiety disorder.

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    1) Implement spirituality as a tool for increasing client resilience and well-being; and,

    2) Formulate treatment and provide interventions for clients experiencing faith crisis.

  • Present a quick overview of human trafficking – stats, victim and perpetrator profiles, law enforcement and legal perspectives, treatment needs and options; then, Recognize potential signs of human trafficking victimization, positively approach and assess the trauma and other needs of these victims, and discuss treatment approaches through case studies. Addiction is one of the most powerful tools human traffickers have to coerce, manipulate, and exploit victims. By creating or perpetuating a dependency on opioids and acting as a means for continued access, traffickers can prolong exploitation situations.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Present a quick overview of human trafficking – stats, victim and perpetrator profiles, law enforcement and legal perspectives, treatment needs and options; then,

    2) Recognize potential signs of human trafficking victimization, positively approach and assess the trauma and other needs of these victims and discuss treatment approaches through case studies.

  • MOVIE & RAP: A DANGEROUS SILENCE [.5 ETHICS CREDIT]

    (Available in-person only)

    Karen W. Malm, PhD

  • EXPERIENTIAL ESCAPE – WHAT YOUR ANCESTORS SAY: AFRICAN DIVINATIONS

    (Available in-person only)

    Bruce E. Frazier

    Bruce has been studying and practicing indigenous traditions for the past 26 years including working with traditional elders from Native American and African tribes, Pacos and Curanderos from Peru, and Shamans in Mongolia. Bruce’s vast experience led him to Dagara Elder Malidoma Patrice Some’ from Bukina Faso, West Africa. The Dagara refer to these readings as “Throwing the Bones” – a casting of shells, charms, and stones on the divination cloth reveal guidance to answer your questions. Personal rituals may be prescribed to enhance your communication with your ancestors and spirit guides.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Trace the origins of divination practices and explain how it’s mechanisms work on the mind, body, and spirit and the commonly experienced outcomes; and,

    2) Describe their own experience from this session and explore how the concepts of ancestors and connections in this modality can be used to enhance ‘clinical’ journeys.

  • EXHIBITS & BREAK – 10:30 – 10:45

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 10:45 – 12:00 (1.25 Each)

  • Update on the clinical research into psychedelic assisted psychotherapies, including those using psilocybin, MDMA, and ketamine. We will discuss the indications and methodologies being researched for these therapies. We will discuss the present and future landscape of availability for these treatments.

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) List and describe the various psychedelics being used, or being studied for use, with and without medical supervision; and,

    2) Describe the landscape of availability for psychedelic assisted psychotherapies in the present and in the near future. Contrast the use and outcomes of each when used under medical supervision and/or ‘guided’ uses versus use without any oversight and be aware of the questions and approaches they should use when they suspect such ‘unsupervised’ use in clients.

  • Using community based strategies to analyze complex social relationships within vulnerable and historically marginalized populations participants will gather to discuss prevention and harm. During this workshop participants can expect to gather in groups, read through materials and challenge themselves to unlearn practices that contribute to the racial harm of marginalized communities using creative interventions. As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) Participants will be able to use equity and justice frameworks to identify the environmental factors that contribute to abuse and violence in relationships in diverse communities; and,

    2) Participants will be able to identify the ways in which the therapeutic industrial complex perpetuates abuse and violence due to lack of awareness about injustice.

  • SUICIDE PREVENTION & EXECUTIVE ROUND TABLE FOR SOLUTIONS   [1.25 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDIT]

    Carol G. Ruddell, MEd (Panel Coordinator); Cory Pearson; Michael J. Staley, PhD; Nels Holmgren, MBA; Jesse P. Higgins, MFT, PhD

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) Present suicide prevention and intervention work currently in process; and,

    2)Identify system gaps and discuss potential solutions and access resources for themselves and their clients as may be necessary.

  • WHAT NOW? RELIGIOUS TRAUMA, FAITH TRANSITION AND ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS [.75 ETHICS CREDIT]

    Jeremy Christensen, LCSW (Coordinator); Aymee Condie, LCSW; Mandy Lynn Danzig, LCSW; Ariel Wootan Merkling, LCSW

    Religious Trauma can impact individuals, families and relationships in many domains including self-identity/worth, belonging, mental health, physical health, self/relationship/societal trust, etc.  Helping clients and families recognize and navigate the many complexities of spiritual trauma, religious deconstruction, personal identity and interfaith relationships are skills that are in increasing demand in mental healthcare. Including discussion on ethical considerations for clinicians.

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    1) Increase awareness and share current knowledge of ethical clinical approaches to religious trauma in individuals, families, communities and relationships across the lifespan; and,

    2) Provide effective ethical working tools for professionals to properly intervene in religious trauma, provide client’s resources and development of healthy strategies to manage resulting life challenges and reconstructing belief systems.

  • EXPERIENTIAL ESCAPE –  NUTRITION, CREATIVE ARTS, FITNESS & COMMUNITY IN SUPPORTING SUSTAINED RECOVERY

    (Available in-person only)

    Fit 2 Recover – Davin Lau, MA;  Tony Ollerton, PhD;  Chelsea Rupp;  Rachel Santizo, AA;  Vickie Shaw

    Fit To Recover will present their four pillar program that supports the mental health and substance use disorder communities. Presenters will explore how community connection through engagement in fitness, service, nutrition and creative arts has positively impacted sustained recovery and social identity transformation. All levels welcome.

    After attending this experiential, participants will be able to:

    1) Discuss how nutrition, movement and creative arts can impact those in recovery and contribute to their quality of life; and,

    2) Describe their own experience from this session and explore how these modalities may be incorporated into their own practices for improved outcomes based upon the science backing each.

  • We all know that autism diagnoses are on the rise in children and about autism in adults. However, autistic children grow up to be autistic adults and will likely need ongoing therapeutic support to manage life and their own mental health. Many autistic adults who work with adult providers are quickly labeled with personality disorders because their behaviors “look” similar to behaviors exhibited by individuals with personality disorders (i.e., women often are diagnosed as having BPD, men with schizoid pd, narcissism or anti-social traits).

    This causes a problem, because interventions that might work well for adults with PD, they often need to be significantly adjusted for individuals with autism. We will discuss how to identify differences in presentation between PD and ASD and then will discuss how to work with autistic adults in therapy in a supportive and effective fashion and how to integrate parts of common strategies borrowed from DBT and other therapeutic concepts.

    Once participants have attended this workshop, they will be able to:

    1) Present the symptom overlap between Autism Spectrum Disorder and personality disorders in adult clients and discuss assessment methods and interview questions to help gather necessary data for diagnosis; then,

    2) Design a treatment plan incorporating interventions currently believed to be most effective for individuals for adult autism spectrum disorder.

  • Women who choose to place their child for adoption face a loss and trauma that is rarely discussed. When a child is created within a woman’s body, the bond isn’t something that is every broken. Dealing with this loss can present multiple challenges and life changing events. This presentation covers the many things that do happen to many women due to the pain that can’t be overcome. Because adoption has changed through the years it gives an overview to closed, open and semi-open adoption and the navigations that is critical to a level of success for relationships to endure. It provides the interactions that both the birthing parents and adopting parents face and so many of the issues that face each side. The presenter dives through her own journey and why she chose to create and organization that focuses on the mental health of the birth mother. It looks at what the loss does to so many women and how they attempt to deal with it. It discusses the things adoptive families should know and how they can understand many of the things that a birth mother might present them with through her grieving and finding solutions to move on. Those who attend should come away with a much better understanding of birth parents and how PTS and trauma affects the life of women who chose to place.

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    1) Portray the common paths to adoption, including the psychological challenges, the potential legal entanglements, and the short- and long- term paths. Provide better insight to the challenges faced by women who have placed. The adoptive families to adapt; then,

    2) Outline the trauma-informed approaches effectively used in adoption, along with the proper terminology and sensitivities which should play into approaches with individuals, couples, and families during the active and long-term stages of adoption.

  • Recognizing functional and cognitive changes in older adults, how they are measured, and what interventions might be appropriate for behavioral change.

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) Present some of the special circumstances and considerations which must be addressed when working with older adults and/or their families and partners; and,

    2)Translate these considerations into practice and include approaches / interventions which appropriately and ethically address them.

  • MOVIE & RAP: MEET THE MAN WITH 3 WIVES [.25 ETHICS CREDIT]

    (Available in-person only)

    Karen W. Malm, PhD

    https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfv4ScyMlPhFyOu5TLX8XoKy7qMAQ2QwBjBLHu2Kv4M_j7f9w/viewform

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1)Describe the basic beliefs of fundamentalism and trace the multi-generational growth and lifestyle of this population – including their traditions and views of health and behavioral health; and,

    2)Explore the needs of individuals who leave this lifestyle and describe the path of therapeutic interventions which may be most effective in providing support and direction/resources.

  • LUNCH – ON YOUR OWN   12:00 – 1:15

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 1:15 – 2:30 (1.25 Each)

  • For more than 180 years, followers of Joseph Smith’s Mormon (fundamental) teachings have practiced plural marriage, also known as polygamy. For nearly the same amount of time, “polygamists” have been reviled. Government and law enforcement actions against the population have created a culture that operated largely underground. Today, there are many different groups that practice various versions of the “Faith,” but one tenet unites them: fear of government, law enforcement and the justice system. As a result, many crimes within the communities remain unreported and many fear to access appropriate healthcare and social services, compounding issues that arise from multi-generational trauma, health issues and poverty. This double-bind leaves the population vulnerable for exploitation and abuse.

    This section will provide a brief history of Mormon polygamy, an introduction to the culture, brief examinations of terms and suggestions for culturally sensitive, trauma-informed and evidence-based processes and services when service folks from plural communities and cultures. The presenter was born into polygamy and has been providing social services for people from this culture for 10+ years.

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) TBD; and,

    2) TBD

  • Better Data = Better Outcomes

    There is no standard of care for addiction treatment. Spending continuously increases, yet addiction levels continue to rise. Current testing methods are inadequate and do not provide treatment professionals with the tools they need. This training synopsis describes some of the ways that drug testing can contribute to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of patients seen in primary care, the management of the treatment of chronic pain, and the identification and treatment of substance use disorders. The term drug testing can be confusing because it implies that the test will detect the presence of all drugs. However, drug tests target only. specific drugs or drug classes and can detect substances only when that are present above predetermined thresholds (cutoff levels). The term drug screening can also be deceptive because it is often used to describe all types of drug testing. However, drug screening is usually used in forensic drug testing to refer to the use of immunoassay tests to distinguish specimens that test negative for a drug and/or metabolite from positive specimens.

    Once participants have attended this session, they will be able to:

    1) Inform clinicians tools to assess patient use, the efficacy of the treatment plan; and,

    2) Outline dangerous medication interactions during treatment.

  • KEEP ON TRUCKIN’ – CREATIVE WAYS TO WORK AROUND WORKFORCE ISSUES

    Bryant Jenks, LMFT (Panel Coordinator); Corry Smith, LCSW; Chris Westover, LCSW; Mike Wilkins, PhD

    As a result of listening to these panel experts, individuals will leave able to:

    1) Discuss the workforce changes of the last few years including employee expectations, shortages, state boundary issues with licensing and hiring outside of the state, burnout issues, demands on employees and employers, best placement considerations and employee vetting, etc.; and,

    2) Incorporate ways into their own practices or help others in practice to meet employer and client needs, keep employees engaged, and provide seamless service to clients.

  • HAVING DIFFICULT CONVERSATIONS

    Pam Bennett, LCSW (Coordinator); John Hales;  Paige Huff, LCSW;  Damon Talbot 

    This presentation will discuss the dynamics of hard conversations with skills that van be used for improved chances of a productive result. Presenters will include both professional staff and clients, reviewing scenarios from both sides of the desk.

    Once participants have attended this session, they will be able to:

    1) Demonstrate techniques that can be used in conversations when approaching difficult topics without putting the other individual into defensive or passive modes. This shall include topics such as the needs for treatment, new housing (i.e., assisted living), life changes (i.e., revoking of driving privileges), family concerns, health/behavioral health diagnoses, etc.; and,
    2) Assess how the conversation is being received by the other person and be able to adjust the approach appropriately to lead to the best outcomes.

  • By exploring the pathways of indigenous, nomadic, and traditional wisdom keepers we are invited to explore our implicit bias around issues regarding constructs around mental health, health and healing paradigms and our own self perceptions as seeing our roles as healers. What might we learn from our wisdom keepers how to find balance in self-care as we seek to facilitate care and healing in our clients? Shamanic traditions will be explored and examined, as well as constructs around Spirituality, Ancestral Wisdom, Shamanism and find practical applications in our journey as healers.

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    • Explain indigenous spiritual technologies/paradigms that may enhance our sense of self care as well as client care; and,
    • Participants will demonstrate an increase and sense of collective and communal adaptations required to shift the paradigm from template compliance and give increased permission to allow for dialogue and process around manners of soul and spirit as we engage with clients around holistic approaches to wellness.
  • PAIN MANAGEMENT AND SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER

    Clarissa Peterson, MPAS, PA-C (Supported by the Opioid Response Network)

    This presentation will provide recommendations for managing acute and chronic pain, with an emphasis on treating with non-controlled substances. We will review opioid dependence, preventing dependency and addiction, harm reduction, and emphasize managing pain in patients with substance use disorders.

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    • Review epidemiological data of pain, and SUD. Review context of treating patients with SUD who have pain. Discuss goals of therapy, team approach, harm reduction; and,
    • Work with the medical team and prescribers to observe Non-CS acute pain management options. Non-CS chronic pain management options, and Alternative/complementary treatments.
  • Reiki is a Japanese technique that promotes relaxation, stress reduction, and healing. Reiki is based on the idea that an unseen “life force energy” flows through us. If your life force energy is high, you are more capable of being happy and healthy. Reiki, or “spiritually guided life force energy” is channeled through the practitioner to the client, clearing blockages in one’s life force energy. Reiki treats the whole person including the body, emotions, mind, and spirit creating a sense of relaxation, peace, security, and well-being. Many have reported miraculous results. After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Trace the origins of reiki and explain how its mechanisms work on the mind, body, and spirit and the commonly experienced outcomes; and,

    2) Describe their own experience from this session and explore how the concepts of reiki can be used to enhance ‘clinical’ journeys and relieve “compassion fatigue”.

  • LIVE ON UTAH: MEASURING THE IMPACT OF PUBLIC MESSAGING FOR SUICIDE PREVENTION  [1.25 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDIT]

    Allison Foust, MHA, MCHES (Panel Coordinator); Steve Wright, MPC; Samantha Ball, MPP, PhD

    Live On is a public-private mental health and suicide prevention campaign that aims to

    modify attitudes and social norms to reduce suffering and save lives. The population-

    oriented, evidence-informed effort brings together diverse partners to develop, launch,

    and evaluate powerful and effective content to: 1) Establish mental health and suicide

    prevention as a priority for all Utahns, 2) promote protective behaviors and beliefs, such

    as increasing knowledge and acceptance around help-seeking, safe firearm storage, and

    stigma reduction, and 3) provide hope and encourage social connection. Live On is the

    first time Utah has taken on a comprehensive, large-scale, multi-platform effort of this

    type around the issue of mental health and suicide—one that goes beyond individual

    marketing efforts or one-off messaging initiatives. Campaign methods over the last

    three years have included, but are not limited to, radio and tv spots, public messaging

    at businesses, billboards, social media content, and website and resource development.

    Presenters will discuss lessons learned, how to implement successful public-private partnerships to address public health concerns, and evaluation of efforts through the Kem Gardner Policy Institute.

  • https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfv4ScyMlPhFyOu5TLX8XoKy7qMAQ2QwBjBLHu2Kv4M_j7f9w/viewform

    The addiction crisis in America has reached a new boiling point, and courageous people – at all levels, from all walks of life – are rising to answer the call. TIPPING THE PAIN SCALE follows individuals grappling with the current systemic failures of how we have dealt with addiction in communities and their journey to develop and employ new, innovative, and often controversial solutions to the problem. It is a quasi-anthology, weaving characters through their own stories as they connect to the issues plaguing all communities and the country in an urgent fight to save lives.

    Featuring Secretary of Labor, Marty Walsh; NFL Pro Bowl Player, Darren Waller; Spoken Word Artist and Educator Joseph Green; WA State Representative, Lauren Davis; Community Outreach Volunteer, Roz Pichardo; and Boston Police Officer Josh de la Rosa, with Music from Sia.

    Afterwards there will be a panel with Dr. Jeremy Cottle moderating.

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) Show how individuals have grappled with current systemic failures of how the U.S. has dealt with addiction; and,

    2) Show how new, innovative, and often controversial solutions have been met and how they have impacted this epidemic while raising awareness as much as ethical concerns.

  • EXHIBITS & BREAK – 2:30 – 2:45

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 2:45 – 3:45 (1 Hour)

  • Target audience: All levels
    This presentation will focus on the innate spiritual aspect of illness and explore how this plays out through our work and our lives. Much of western culture focuses on a very mechanical view of the universe which produces incredible fear in the world. Each one of us is seen as separate needing to collect the necessary resources to provide us security. This view proposes that is we could only fix everything all will go back to normal. But clearly this is not the case. To move beyond the fear of not having what we want, not being what we want, not having the strength to face our lack we are invited to find our own path to a bigger vision free of fear. Shamanic practices have been used for 10s of thousands of years to facilitate connection, create ceremony and heal illness. Once attendees participated in this session, they will be able to:1) Understand the alternative healing modality of shamanic practice; and,

    2) Explore how our western culture invites separation and fear. Experience practices that may connect us to our higher potential free of fear.

  • This interactive session will help participants with beginning to intermediate motivational interviewing skills improve their ability to promote change talk through effective reflections. The session will be dedicated to focused, hands-on practice where participants will engage in real-world training exercises with peers.

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    1) Discuss ways to recognize and reinforce change talk; and,

    2) Improve their ability to use reflections to promote change talk.

  • Post-acute COVID-19 (PACS) is a condition that will develop in 10-30% of those infected with the SARS-COV-2 virus and involves physical, cognitive, sleep, and emotional symptoms. Emotional sequela from COVID-19 are particularly complex considering the direct effects of the virus and the indirect effects of the pandemic. This presentation will cover newfound mechanisms of emotional sequelae of COVID-19, their treatment, and resources researchers and practitioners should be aware of as the population of those with PACS steadily increases.

    Once attendees participated in this session, they will be able to:
    1) Describe the post-viral physiology contributing to poor mental health outcomes after COVID-19; and,

    2) Demonstrate results of multimodal and multidisciplinary treatment for post-acute COVID-19.

  • The DEA will provide an overview of drug trafficking trends. The presentation will cover general drug trafficking methodologies utilized by criminal organizations in Utah, and will discuss the most significant drug threats to our local communities based on law enforcement intelligence and seizures. Once participants have attended this session, they will be able to:

    1) Present the current trends of substances of abuse that are sweeping our nation and state; and,

    2) Report on law enforcement’s perspectives and duties related to these trends, what they are seizing, what they perceive as the major threats currently and in the future, and how they interface with corrections and treatment resources.

  • HISTORICAL IMPACTS OF HOMELESSNESS AND THE PATHWAYS FORWARD

    Amanda Christensen, LCSW; Danielle Nives, CSW, Jaime Klemz, CMHC

    Trace the past courses of homelessness and project future directions and discuss its impact on communities, individuals with behavioral health issues and addiction; and Trace positive courses for getting out of homeless – including special populations such as the single adults, and youth, and the resources, wrap-around services, and other connected factors. Be able to identify gaps in these systems and work with individuals who are currently homeless or are just coming out of this situation.

    Once participants have attended this session, they will be able to:

    1) Trace the past courses of homelessness and project future directions and discuss its impact on communities, individuals with behavioral health issues and addiction; and,

    2) Trace positive courses for getting out of homeless – including special populations such as military, women and families and the resources, wrap-around services, and other connected factors. Be able to identify gaps in these systems and work with individuals who are currently homeless or are just coming out of this situation.

  • GANGS IN UTAH

    Jerry Valdez

    A brief history on Gangs in Utah and how they have evolved into our communities today. Have an understanding of gang membership, generational gangs and what makes Utah Gangs unique. Recognizing signs of gang membership and how to work with Law Enforcement when it comes to dealing with gang members and gang violence.

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) Trace the history of gangs throughout Utah and recognize ‘red flags’ of gang involvement in clients and/or family members; and,

    2) Present ways clinicians can better work with law enforcement and effectively approach and treat gang members – of all ages, including older gang members and their families.

  • This presentation will describe and demonstrate experiential, interactive, and playful approaches, techniques, and interventions for working with children, teens, adults, couples, and families. We will use art, crafts, toys, sand, and other playful tools. Attendees will gain practical experiential skills to use during therapy sessions. This presentation is appropriate for all levels, from beginners to advanced practitioners.

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    1) Trace the origins of art therapy practices and explain how it’s mechanisms work on the mind, body, and spirit and the commonly experienced outcomes; and,

    2) Describe their own experience from this session and explore how this modality can be used to enhance ‘clinical’ journeys with adults as well as youth.

  • https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfv4ScyMlPhFyOu5TLX8XoKy7qMAQ2QwBjBLHu2Kv4M_j7f9w/viewform

    The addiction crisis in America has reached a brand new boiling point, and courageous people – at all levels, from all walks of life – are rising to answer the call. TIPPING THE PAIN SCALE follows individuals grappling with the current systemic failures of how we have dealt with addiction in communities and their journey to develop and employ new, innovative, and often controversial solutions to the problem. It is a quasi-anthology, weaving characters through their own stories as they connect to the issues plaguing all communities and the country in an urgent fight to save lives.

    Featuring Secretary of Labor, Marty Walsh; NFL Pro Bowl Player, Darren Waller; Spoken Word Artist and Educator Joseph Green; WA State Representative, Lauren Davis; Community Outreach Volunteer, Roz Pichardo; and Boston Police Officer Josh de la Rosa, with Music from Sia.

    Afterwards there will be a panel with Dr. Jeremy Cottle moderating.

    As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

    1) Show how individuals have grappled with current systemic failures of how the U.S. has dealt with addiction; and,

    2) Show how new, innovative, and often controversial solutions have been met
    and how they have impacted this epidemic while raising awareness as much
    as ethical concerns.

  • CLOSING KEYNOTE – 4:00 – 5:00 (1 Hour)

  • By the time she was 18 years old, Jamie MoCrazy had won Junior World Championships and moved to Utah to continue training as a professional slope style and halfpipe skier. In 2013, she went on to become the first woman in the world to land a double backflip at X-Games. In 2015, Jamie experienced a horrific crash at the World Tour Finals that resulted in her going into a coma, sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and becoming paralyzed. In an instant, Jamie went from being one of the world’s best slopestyle skiers to relearning basic gross motor skills like walking upstairs and riding a bike. Despite the monumental challenges, Jamie’s mom made the decision to use her education to help Jamie heal which has turned into the peer reviewed TBI education MoCrazy Strong teaches. Today, Jamie develops keynotes, directed the short documentary #MoCrazyStrong which premiered 2.25.2023, and is the executive director of MoCrazy Strong Inc.

    As a result of participating in this workshop, individuals will be able to:

    1) Assist individuals with behavioral health disorders or traumatic experiences to shift their perceptions and beliefs around their ‘diagnoses’ to identify the strengths which exist and may develop from their situation; and,

    2) Incorporate goal setting and the process of ‘turning goals into habits’ into treatment plans for clients and use both objectives in their own lives.

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