Right on track with 2021, this year’s program will provide you with the most timely information and skills to keep you in the control car and on top of your field. Whether you opt to participate live or virtually, you will gain insights from top national and local experts as you look into the critical issues facing your practice today.

MONDAY, MAY 3RD

CLICK SESSION FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • REGISTRATION, EXHIBITS & CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST – 7:15 – 8:00

  • WELCOME – 8:00 – 9:15
    KEYNOTE: WHAT THE LIVES & CRIMES OF MASS SHOOTERS CAN TEACH US ABOUT VIOLENCE PREVENTION IN A TIME OF COVID-19

    James Densley, MSc, MST, DPhil

    “For over three years, James Densley has studied the life histories of mass shooters in the United States for an initiative funded by the National Institute of Justice, known as The Violence Project. He’s built a database dating back to 1966 of every shooter who killed four or more people in a public place and has interviewed incarcerated mass shooters and their families and friends; people who planned a shooting but changed their minds; shooting survivors, and first responders. The findings point to new data-driven pathways to violence prevention like crisis intervention and suicide prevention, (social)media literacy and accountability, and sensible firearms regulation, which are especially important at the time of a global pandemic. Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Assess the impact of COVID-19 on mass violence and how some of our current interventions might be doing more harm than good; and,

    2) Apply crisis intervention and de escalation to mass violence prevention.”

  • EXHIBITS & BREAK – 9:15 – 9:30

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 9:30 – 10:30

  • AREN’T WE PAST STIGMA YET? HOW TO COUNTER THE EFFECTS OF STIGMA IN YOUR PRACTICE & OUR COMMUNITIES – 9:30 – 10:30

    Susan Murphy, PhD

    Melissa Reeder, LCSW

    Addict, recovery, relapse, drug of choice, getting clean: these are a few examples of some of the most common terms employed by individuals who both treat and struggle with substance use. Language is powerful; a single word can communicate messages of hope just as easily as it can perpetuate negative stereotypes about entire groups of people, especially those with substance use disorders. The focus of this session is to critically examine implicit messages we may be unintentionally communicating to our clients and to explore the utility of embracing a more strengths-based, compassionate vocabulary.

    After hearing these experts, participants will be able to:

    1) Recall some commonly used, yet outdated, terms related to SUDs and mental health symptoms and conditions which can negatively impact the psyche of those in treatment and/or recovery; and,

    2) Illustrate ways providers can confront and counter the negative effects of these stigmas in order to provide more effective interventions for individuals and communities as a whole.

  • GENETICS AND MENTAL HEALTH IN THE PRESENT AND THE FUTURE – (.25 ETHICS CREDIT) 9:30 – 10:30

    Hilary Coon, PhD

    This presentation will cover progress in psychiatric genetics, including methods used by the research community and major challenges faced by researchers engaged in genetic discovery for psychiatric conditions. An overview of major findings will be presented, with a focus on schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, autism spectrum disorder, and suicide. The presentation will discuss necessary work required to bring research findings in psychiatric genetics into practical clinical practice, including use of genetic results to guide pharmacotherapy, to identify drug targets, to identify particular vulnerable subgroups, and to provide early identification for targeted interventions. Ethical implications and the need for careful use of results will be discussed.

    After hearing this presentation, participations will be able to:

    1. Quickly overview the latest information in the field of genetics as it relates to mental health and addictions and the treatment thereof; and,

    2. Translate some of this knowledge into treatment implications including, but not limited to, use of pharmacologic agents and project some of the future directions of genetics in the behavioral health arenas.

  • NUTRITION, MENTAL HEALTH & MICROBIOMES – 9:30 – 10:30

    Amy de la Garza, MD

    After hearing this presentation, participations will be able to:

    1) Discuss the concepts behind functional and holistic medicine as they relate to nutrition, mental health, addiction, and the human microbiome and incorporate some of these key components into their own practices; and,

    2) Develop some creative approaches to help individuals improve their own microbiomes especially when they are affected by behavioral health issues such as depression and psychosis which negatively impact their ADLs and other abilities such as cooking, shopping, et cetera.

  • INTRODUCTION TO RADICALLY OPEN DIALECTICAL BEHAVIORAL THERAPY (RO DBT): TREATING OVER CONTROLLED PERSONALITIES  9:30 – 10:30

    Kimberly England, CMHC

    “We don’t see things as they are, we see things as we are.” Thomas R. Lynch, PhD (creator RO DBT) Radically Open Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (RO DBT) is a therapeutic approach created by Thomas R. Lynch. RO DBT is effective in treating clients struggling with inernalized over control. Over controlled (OC) traits include rigid thinking, flat affect, perfectionism, traits of OCD, eating disordered traits, as well as pervasive depression and anxiety. RO DBT encourages the cultivation of a more flexible mind set as well as response to novelty to assist clients with successfully navigating whatever may come their way as well as increase social connection.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Identify individuals who may benefit from DBT as well as Radically Open DBT and discuss the differences; and,

    2) Apply DBT and track it’s effectiveness in working with over-rigid and controlled personalities.

  • SHORT-TERM CRISIS STABILIZATION / THE BIG PICTURE & MENTAL HEALTH CRISIS RESPONSE (.25 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDITS)  9:30 – 10:30

    Ron. L. Bruno

    Nichole Cunha, LCSW

    LeeAnne Huff, CMHC (Mod.)

    Rachel Lucynski

    Denia-Marie Ollerton, CMHC

    Carlos A. Palomo, LCSW

    A “Bird’s Eye View” of the current mental health crisis response system in Utah; how to become skilled in utilizing the existing system to advocate for your clients and community. Discuss potential future directions to further improve emergency response. Review the pros and cons of the current mental health crisis response system, ways to have appropriate responders involved, gap identification and system needs.

    After attending this presentation, you will be able to:

    1) Explain the emergency / disaster response systems from dispatch to law enforcement and the interaction with MCOT and crisis stabilization centers and others. This explanation shall include, but not be limited to, the pros and cons of the current system, ways, to have appropriate responders involved, gap identification and system needs; and,

    2) Trace the evolution of this system and discuss potential future directions to further improve emergency and law enforcement response and short-term crisis stabilization from the field to the hospital and aftercare treatment.

  • TELEHEALTH & ETHICS – (1.0 ETHICS CREDITS) 9:30 – 10:30

    Clifton Uckerman, LCSW

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Discuss the expanding role of telehealth and outline some common ethical dilemmas associated with this practice; and,

    2) Develop their own protocols for telehealth practices including protective measures to promote ethical practices.

  • THE IMPACT OF COVID ON ALL GENERATIONS (LIGHTENING ROUND) – 9:30 – 10:30

    Brooks Keeshin, MD

    Chase Knaphus, LCSW, MPA

    Quang-Tuyen Nguyen, MD

    Nubia Pena, JD

    Kristina Purganan, DO

    Kimberly Myers, MSW (Mod)

    As communities and individuals across Utah, the country, and the world have been coping with the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic for well over a year now. In this time, there has also been growing worry that the impacts of both the pandemic and public health disease mitigation strategies, including stay-at-home orders and social distancing, would have negative impacts on behavioral health outcomes in Utah.

    In this Lighting Round we will hear from a number of panelists discussing both the shared and unique experiences of the pandemic for various populations including individuals with serious mental illness, individuals on the autism spectrum, people involved in criminal justice, front-line workers, and family caregivers. Panelists will also discuss concrete strategies to support the behavioral and overall health of various communities.

    Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Trace the impact of COVID-19 on individuals in special populations and some of the common issues each have faced; and,

    2) Discuss and assess for these impacts short and long-term effects and consequences, the impact of isolation and routine, ‘red flags’ for professionals to identify, and other factors specific to each; and, provide support, education, and therapeutic interventions to assist these individuals and their families.

  • EXHIBITS & BREAK – 10:30 – 10:45

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 10:45 – 12:00

  • CRISIS STABILIZATION / THE SKILLS – (.5 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDITS) 10:45 – 12:00

    Denia-Marie Ollerton, CMHC

    Carlos A. Palomo, LCSW

    How to help in a “crisis”. Discussion around best practices in crisis.

    Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Outline and detail various crisis models and components; and,

    2) Describe the various perspectives and approaches – including ‘talk down techniques’ of various first responders.

  • EXPANDING HEALTH PARADIGMS BY SITTING WITH THE ANCESTORS 10:45 – 12:00

    Jerry Buie, LCSW

    This presentation will explore various indigenous and cultural technologies with a challenge for the listener to expand the paradigm of mental health outside of the bias of western thinking. This exploration will consider the spiritual as it relates to body and mind health and will draw from the presenter’s experiences in working with indigenous healers from various shamanic practices from around the world including South America, Africa and Mongolia.

    After attending this program, participants will be able to:

    1) Provide examples of cultural nuances related to behavioral health, which, if respected, could enhance impact treatment outcomes; and,

    2) Demonstrate an appreciation for a diverse clientele and tap into client’s own capacity to find meaningful treatment outcomes as well as find meaning in the process. Also, deepen the appreciation for the client’s personal and cultural lens in accessing a sense of what works in the healing/recovery process. Exploring the client’s signature approach to healing and growth.

  • EXPERIENTIAL ESCAPE – 10:45 – 12:00
    SOUND HEALING & REIKI

    Clinton Kennedy

    Katie Kennedy

    LAUGHTER, MOVEMENT, PLAY, RHYTHM AND VIBRATIONS

    Mike Liston, Group Ryhthm Facilitator

    Hands-on, interactive, movement and rhythm-based session; no musical experience necessary. We’ll play games, learn basic playing technique, simple rhythms, improvise and learn facilitation tools. Participants will feel better, get out of your head, laugh, move, play, and find your rhythm while making music with others using drums and percussion. Zero experience needed.

    Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Identify individuals who may benefit from the adjunct therapies demonstrated; and,

    2) Teach and apply the various adjunct therapies.

  • FINDING HOPE: GUIDANCE FOR SUPPORTING THOSE AT RISK – (1.25 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDITS) 10:45 – 12:00

    Taryn Hiatt, BS

    This presentation will provide guidance on how to support someone with “lived experience of suicide” while also taking care of your own well-being. (Beginning)

    After attending this program, participants will be able to:

    1) Explain suicide warning signs and how to respond to a crisis; and,

    2) Explain The Recovery Process, Treatment Option and How to Create a Safe Environment including but not limited to Resources and Self-Care Tips.

  • OPIOIDS, PAIN, THE BRAIN, AND HYPERKATIFEAI: A FRAMEWORK FOR THE RATIONAL USE OF OPIOIDS FOR PAIN – 10:45 – 12:00

    George F. Koob, PhD

    Alcohol and Drug addiction are chronically relapsing disorders characterized by compulsive drug seeking that is hypothesized to derive from multiple sources of motivational dysregulation, one of which is negative reinforcement driven by the emotional pain of alcohol withdrawal and protracted abstinence. The construct of negative reinforcement, defined as alcohol taking that alleviates a negative emotional state or hyperkatifeia (pain, hypohedonia, dysphoria, anxiety, hyperalgesia, irritability, and sleep disturbances) that is created by alcohol abstinence. In animal models, repeated misuse of alcohol results in negative emotion-like states reflected in increased reward thresholds, decreased pain thresholds, anxiety-like and dysphoric-like responses. Such negative emotional-like states that drive negative reinforcement are hypothesized to derive from dysregulation of key neurochemical circuits within the brain reward and stress systems (corticotropin-releasing factor, dynorphin, norepinephrine, hypocretin, vasopressin, glucocorticoids, and neuroimmune factors) in the extended amygdala. Compelling evidence exists to argue that hyperkatifeia triggered by acute excessive drug intake, is sensitized during the development of compulsive alcohol taking with repeated withdrawal, persists into protracted abstinence, and contributes to the development and persistence of compulsive alcohol seeking. Significant overlap in the engagement in the addiction of circuits mediating brain emotional pain, and brain physical pain may help explain the prominent role of alcohol drugs in “deaths of despair”.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Discuss the theoretical framework of hyperkatifeia and negative reinforcement that drives drug seeking in the withdrawal/negative affect stage; and,

    2) Outline the changes in the brain neurocircuitry that mediate hyperkatifeia and negative reinforcement in the withdrawal/negative affect stage.

  • RIDING THE COVID-19 TRAIN: IT’S IMPACT ON SPECIAL COMMUNITIES & OUR SEARCH FOR THE NEW NORMAL – (.5 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDITS) 10:45 – 12:00

    Julia Connelly, PhD

    James Densley, MSc, MST, DPhil

    Michael Friedricks, MS

    Jason Hunziker, MD

    Andrew J. Smith, PhD

    Kimberly Myers, MSW (Mod)

    As communities and individuals across Utah, the country, and the world have been coping with the evolution of the COVID-19 pandemic for well over a year now. In this time, there has also been growing worry that the impacts of both the pandemic and public health disease mitigation strategies, including stay at home orders and social distancing, would have negative impacts on behavioral health outcomes in Utah.

    In this Lightening Round we will hear from a number of panelists discussing both the shared and unique experiences of the pandemic for various populations including individuals with serious mental illness, individuals on the autism spectrum, people involved in criminal justice, front-line workers, and family caregivers. Panelists will also discuss concrete strategies to support the behavioral and overall health of various communities.

    After gaining information from this session, participants will be able to:

    1) Trace the impact of COVID-19 on individuals in special populations and some of the common issues each have faced. Discuss and assess for these impacts short and long-term effects and consequences, the impact of isolation and routine, ‘red flags’ for professionals to identify, and other factors specific to each; and

    2) Provide support, education, and therapeutic interventions to assist these individuals and their family and community groups to recreate themselves and adapt to their changing milieus throughout the various stages of this pandemic.

  • TOEING THE LINE: LEGAL & ETHICAL PRACTICES IN TODAY’S GENERATION – (1.25 ETHICS CREDITS) 10:45 – 12:00

    Benjamin Baker, BS, SFO

    An overview of DOPL complaint process & investigating. Main take away will be to know your license regulations.

    After gaining information from this session, participants will be able to:

    1) Outline DOPL complaint process; and,

    2) Describe how and where to get information regarding practice questions.

  • LUNCH & FEATURE PRESENTATION – INFLAMATORY DEPRESSION – (12:15 – 1:15) 12:00-1:30

    Mark Hyman Rapaport, MD

    This presentation discusses;
    (1) The complexity of inflammation – acute vs. chronic. Positive effects vs. negative consequences
    (2) A brief review of inflammation and acute vs. chronic presentations with psychiatric patients
    (3) Depression and inflammation
    (4) Treatment approaches for inflammatory depression
    (5) W-3 fatty acids

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 1:30 – 2:45

  • ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY – A SHOCKINGLY EFFECTIVE TREATMENT – 1:30 – 2:45

    Anthony Petersen, MD

    Seizures were first used to treat mental health problems in the 16th century. Since that time, Electroconvulsive Therapy has evolved greatly, gaining favor and losing favor as a reflection of the ethics surrounding its use at various times in psychiatric history. Thankfully, ECT remains available for patients suffering from a wide variety of mental health diagnosis, from Major Depressive Disorder to Schizophrenia to Dementia with Behavioral Agitation. It is by far the most effective treatment in all of psychiatry, and one of the most effective treatments in all of medicine.

    After gaining insights from this panel of recovering professionals, attendees will be able to:

    1) Report on the latest findings around ECT as well as the basics including, but not limited to indications for use, ‘red flags’, procedures, and expected outcomes; and,

    2) Identify individuals who may benefit from ECT and be able to refer and help them access appropriate services and continue to serve as a member of the multi-disciplinary treatment team.

  • EMPATHY & THE MACHINE: THE USE OF MACHINE LEARNING TO EXPLORE AND EVALUATE THE CONTENT OF PSYCHOTHERAPY – 1:30 – 2:45

    Zac Imel, PhD

    Substance use disorders can be effectively treated by evidence-based counseling approaches. Indeed, millions of Americans receive counseling for each year. However, there is no scalable method for sustaining treatment quality. In community settings supervision rarely occurs, and does not include performance-based feedback. Methods for evaluating treatment fidelity were designed in research settings and rely on human-intensive processes that are expensive and time-consuming (e.g., human raters evaluate recordings).

    Counseling is essentially a conversation – the data is spoken language. Advances in natural language processing have made it possible to explore the content of psychotherapy at a scale and level of detail that has not been possible before. I will describe my group’s current work in this area, in particular focusing on how new tools can be used to evaluate the content of

    As a result of attending this session, participants will be able to:

    1) Introduce attendees to basic concepts related to machine learning in mental health. Describe current research on the evaluation of psychotherapy data with machine learning tools; and,

    2) Describe new findings related to predicting treatment outcomes directly from session recordings.

  • EXPERIENTIAL ESCAPE – 1:30 – 2:05 / 2:05 – 2:45
    BODY WORK

    Juanita Ramos

    YEN YOGA

    Alicia Thompson

    Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Identify individuals who may benefit from the adjunct therapies demonstrated; and,

    2) Teach and apply the various adjunct therapies.

  • FAITH TRANSITION, SPIRITUAL TRAUMA & MENTAL HEALTH: AN EVOLVING CONVERSATION – (1 ETHICS CREDIT)  1:30 – 2:45

    Tony Overbay, LMFT

    Spiritual Trauma is getting more press lately and reportedly presenting in clinical treatment more frequently and people are transitioning across and away from organized religions at greater rates. Resulting anxiety, family/social conflict and existential crisis are presenting in mental health treatment setting more frequently. Presenters will address this ongoing conversation from a Statewide perspective and how both religious institutions and individual practitioners are responding in more meaningful and supportive ways respecting the current beliefs and experience of the individual.

    Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Participants will receive an overview of efforts across Utah to address spirituality and mental health in general; and,

    2) Participants will receive an overview & sharing of direct experience of experts working across faith and mental health.

  • MISSED & MISDIAGNOSED AUTISM IN ADULTS: UNNECESSARY STRUGGLES – 1:30 – 2:45

    Julia Connelly, PhD

    Discuss the importance of correct ASD diagnosis for adults and impact of missed diagnosis or misdiagnosis. We will discuss common misdiagnoses, including personality disorders and anxiety/mood/etc disorders. We will also discuss resources for adults who are wanting to get assessed for ASD.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Recognize the potential signs of autism in adults and which may have been missed or misdiagnosed, along with the impact it has, and can have, on the lives of these individuals; and,

    2) Assist these individuals and their caregivers to access appropriate resources for testing, diagnosis and interventions.

  • PATHWAYS TO PEACE: A CHAPLAIN’S PERSPECTIVE ON DYING WITH DIGNITY – (.25 ETHICS CREDITS) 1:30 – 2:45

    Keri Hains Kammerman, BCC

    Spiritual care and end of life care are inseparable, and a critical piece of dying with dignity. The practices of being present in suffering, providing for religious ritual, finding meaning in life and death, and focusing on/finding what is most important are universal and yet unique to each person. Providing for spiritual care during COVID has created both new challenges and new opportunities to creatively connect, empowering chaplains, patients, families, and medical personnel to actively address the importance of this sacred part of the dying process. Also briefly addressed will be supporting parents in their grief when a child dies.

    After spending time with this speaker, participants will be able to:

    1) Define and explore the invaluable role of spiritual care as it applies to death with dignity; and,

    2) Draw from experiences providing spiritual care during COVID more techniques for enhancing spiritual care in the dying process and connecting cross-discipline.

  • THE NEUROBIOLOGY OF TRAUMA IN THE DEVELOPING BRAIN – 1:30 – 2:45

    Lesa K. Ellis, PhD

    The effects of trauma on the brain are varied and complex. Further, studying the effects of trauma on brain development in humans is particularly difficult and involves many ethical restraints. This presentation will review the fundamentals of brain development as well as existing animal and human research on trauma and the brain. In addition, we will explore the degree to which we can generalize animal data to humans, while also discussing the power of neuroplasticity in the developing human brain. This presentation is suitable for practitioners of all levels.

    After listening to this expert, participants will be able to:

    1) Quickly overview the latest neurobiological findings around trauma and anxiety; and,

    2) Translate some of this knowledge into treatment implications for those with trauma histories and/or anxiety disorders.

  • EXHIBITS & BREAK – 2:45 – 3:00

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 3:00 – 4:15

  • HOW TO SLEEP WHEN THE WORLD IS ON FIRE (Professional edition) – 3:00 – 4:15

    Howard M. Leaman, MD

    Insomnia treatment can be “hit or miss.” I will help you develop your own structured sleep interview, explore techniques that we typically use in clinic for insomnia patients and identify some mindfulness exercises for anxiety and insomnia. Finally, we’ll go over the “Top Ten Hit or Miss” list, including sleep medicine referral triggers.

    After hearing this presentation, participations will be able to:

    1) Participate in “Insomnia Boot Camp” to create your own structured sleep intervention (handout); and,

    2) Identify pandemic related sleep disturbances in general and care-giver populations, and review pandemic specific treatment recommendations. Review the “Top Ten Hit or Miss” list.

  • IDENTIFYING, TREATING, AND AFTER CARE FOR CLIENTS WITH A SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER – 3:00 – 4:15

    Scott L. Munden, LCSW

    This presentation will cover what criteria is needed to diagnose a client with a Substance Use Disorder. It will explore challenges and resistance that may arise from clients and their support groups during the intake, treatment, and recovery phases of care. We will look at what tools, resources, and Evidence Based Practices are available in treating Substance Use Disorders. We will also identify ways to overcome challlenges that have arisen from the COVID-19 Pandemic.

    As a result of attending this session, participants will be able to:

    1) Present information around substance use / abuse and what clinicians should recognize as potential ‘red flags’ and how they should intervene to support these individuals in prevention, treatment, and recovery phases; and,

    2) Present some of the unique challenges and impacts brought on by community and social circumstances such as pandemics, isolation, family changes, health concerns and comorbidities, et cetera.

  • PROVIDER RESILIENCE: HOW 2020 CHANGED US & ESSENTIAL SKILLS GOING FORWARD – 3:00 – 4:15

    Ashley Greenwell, PhD

    This last year taxed most of us in new and challenging ways. Along with the extra workload, we’ve been bombarded with messaging on the need for resilience and grit, while many healthcare systems are also struggling to meet the needs of staff and patients. Drawing from recent research as well as practical experience treating clinician burnout, this presentation explores common reactions to chronic stress and core processes essential for enhanced coping. Strategies will move beyond general suggestions for self-care and instead focus on specific guidance to address the real barriers to implementation.

    As a result of attending this session, participants will be able to:

    1) Discuss two current research findings on the nature and scope of burnout amongst clinicians; and,

    2) Apply techniques that allow clinicians to better manage workplace stress and moral distress. Also, identify several common workplace barriers to implementing coping skills and possible solutions.

  • SCREENING FOR INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE – 3:00 – 4:15

    Audrey Jiricko, MD

    Women’s healthcare physician will share lessons learned regarding screening women for intimate partner violence (IPV). We’ll briefly review how to help patients/clients identify when they are in unhealthy relationships, discuss the health implications of IPV, then dive into how healthcare providers and advocates might join forces to provide meaningful services for victims of violence that fill current gaps in care.

    Participants in this session will leave able to:

    1) Recognize the various forms of intimate partner violence and understand the health impact and the role of healthcare providers and advocates to address this preventable public health problem together; and,

    2) Assist victims of intimate partner violence in assessing risk and connect with appropriate resources even in the midst of a pandemic that has increased isolation.

  • STRENGTHENING SUICIDE INTERVENTION WITH MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING & MORE! – (1.25 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDITS)  3:00 – 4:15

    David Wood, PhD

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) is a respectful approach to preparing people for change that places emphasis on client autonomy and evoking the client’s own reasons for change. MI is a framework that recognizes that resolving ambivalence is required prior to making personal enduring change. This workshop will review MI strategies and techniques that can be used to strengthen suicide intervention.

    As a result of participating in this program, participants will be able to:

    1) Describe the important role of a guiding style together with reflective listening as a tool to build rapport with a client who may be at risk of suicide; and,

    2) Identify MI interventions to use during each of the four processes of MI: engaging, focusing, evoking and planning. Also, describe two or more evoking skills that may help the strengthen client change talk (i.e., life talk) and soften client sustain talk (i.e., death talk). Participant will be able to list criteria for when a verbal intervention such as MI may or may not be appropriate for a client at risk of suicide.

  • TRAUMA SURVIVORS PANEL – INSIGHTS YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS – 3:00 – 4:15

    Lisa Hancock, CPSS

    Ryan Hiatt

    Taryn Hiatt

    Karen W. Malm, PhD  (Mod.)

    Angela Mesenburg, CSW

    With all the emphasis on trauma informed care, it is important to recognize that trauma informed care is not a technique, but an approach. It is about how we interact and support the individual to create an environment and atmosphere for safety. Safety in the building block for providing effective treatment for trauma. Our panel includes trauma survivors, some of whom are therapists themselves, who will enlighten the audience on the do’s and don’ts of providing therapy to trauma victims. Participants will learn what is supportive in the therapy experience and what keeps your clients from opening up, trusting and ultimately healing.

    Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Expand and delineate true trauma-informed practices and environments; and,

    2) Evaluate such practices from the trauma survivor’s perspective as to what is more often helpful or non-helpful in their perceived and real recovery.

  • USING ABA TO IMPROVE TREATMENT EXPERIENCES & OUTCOMES FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND/OR SUBSTANCE USE DIAGNOSES & EXECUTIVE FUNCTIONING DEFICITS – 3:00 – 4:15

    Julia Hood, PhD, BCBA-D

    This presentation will discuss the use of ABA to improve treatment outcomes for individuals. ABA is most commonly associated with the treatment of autism, but this presentation will focus on how it is able to help individuals with other diagnoses who have executive functioning deficits. Case studies will be presented specific to Borderline Personality Disorder and Substance Use Disorder. There will be a discussion of some strategies that can be applied across populations.

    After gleaning information from this representative, participants will be able to:

    1) Provide and inventory of how various executive function deficits impact the effectiveness of various traditional treatment interventions for behavioral health and substance use disorders; and,

    2) Incorporate accommodations for these deficits in order to increase client compliance and treatment outcomes.

TUESDAY, MAY 4TH

CLICK SESSION FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • CHECK-IN, EXHIBITS AND CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST – 7:15 – 8:00

  • MORNING YOGA PRACTICE – POWER VINYASA YOGA – 7:15 – 8:00

    John Cottrell, PhD, ERYT-500, CYT

  • WELCOME BACK – 8:00 – 9:00
    KEYNOTE: INTERSECTIONALITY IN PRACTICE: TOWARDS A FUTURE WHERE MANY WORLDS FIT (.75 ETHICS CREDITS)

    Hector Y. Adames, PsyD

    Currently, we are living through one of the most divisive periods in the history of the United States. Such divisiveness often yields hostility towards historically oppressed groups including Black, Indigenous and other People of Color (BIPOC), immigrants, gender and sexual minorities, and the like. There is a  large body of empirical work that underscores the negative impact of oppression on an individual’s health and wellness. However, the impact of systemic oppression is often not emphasized in most of the existing interventions. Hence, healing during socially hostile times requires a radical paradigm shift. To this end, the presentation will (1) provide an overview of intersectionality, which centers the ways in which overlapping oppression impact groups and individuals, and (2) illustrate ways that healthcare providers can integrate an intersectional framework into their clinical practice.

    After hearing from this specialist, participants will be able to:

    1) Describe the tenants of intersectionality; and,

    2) Identify ways to integrate intersectionality into their clinical practice.

  • EXHIBITS & BREAK – 9:00 – 9:15

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 9:15 – 10:15

  • GOT RESISTANCE? USING MI TO TACKLE AMBIVALENT AND OPPOSITIONAL CLIENTS – 9:15 – 10:15

    Larry Chatterton, M.Ed.

    This fun and informative skill building workshop will focus on overcoming discord and sustain talk with MI skills, thus enhancing motivation to change. We will discuss specific skills to engaging and breaking down barriers, as well as increasing, evoking and responding to change talk.

    Once participants have attended this program, they will leave able to:

    1) Describe specific skills to deal with “resistent” clients which can quickly turn resistance into change talk to help clients understand the source of their resistance and move them forward in the change process; and,

    2) Explain the difference between discord and sustain talk and demonstrate how to respond to each.

  • HOMELESSNESS: WHEN THE WALLS FALL – 9:15 – 10:15

    Jamie Bustamante, PhD

    Janida Emerson, MS

    This presentation will address changes in the shelter services in Salt Lake City and how this has impacted the homeless population and service delivery. It will also address the mental health needs of the homeless population including interventions and resources available.

    Once participants have attended this program, they will leave able to:

    1) Outline resources and the changes in those resources for homeless populations over the last few years along with the effects of these changes. Based upon this course and current status, outline what resources are needed to facilitate the movement of individuals from homelessness to home living; and,

    2) Outline the mental health status and needs of homeless populations and how various resources can fill those needs.

  • IT’S ALL RELATED: HOW UNDERSTANDING ACES CAN HELP US IN OUR WORK WITH PEOPLE STRUGGLING WITH SUBSTANCE USE AND MENTAL HEALTH CHALLENGES – 9:15 – 10:15

    Misty McIntyre Goodsell, LCSW

    This presentation will provide a brief review of the ACEs study and then dive into the SUD and mental health outcomes related to adverse events. We will talk about assessment and best practice, and how understanding the link between ACEs, SUD, and Mental Health can transform practice.

    After leaving this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Explore the latest findings around the intersects between Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) substance use / abuse, and mental health impacts; and,

    2) Integrate this information into the processing of screening, assessment, intake and treatment planning.

  • NAVIGATING GUARDIANSHIPS & RELATED ISSUES – 9:15 – 10:15

    Xia Litz Erickson, NMG, CSW

    High level overview of guardianship, what it is, when it is appropriate, alternatives to guardianship, how to petition for guardianship, guardianship oversight, role and responsibilities of a guardian and the role of OPG.

    As a result of attending this session, participants will be able to:

    1) Present general information around guardianships – from youth to older adults; and,

    2) Incorporate this knowledge into their own practices and be able to direct clients and/or families with related options and help them navigate the system and resources.

  • MISSING & MURDERED INDIGENOUS RELATIVES–MYTHS, FACTS, TRAUMA & HEALING       (.25 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDITS)  9:15 – 10:15

    Michelle Q. Chapoose, LSUDC

    Kristina Groves, LCSW

    Although the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW) movement began by focusing on violence against indigenous women, violence against Indigenous relatives (MMIR) occurs at alarmingly high rates, with American Indian and Alaska Native women and men victimized at similar rates–84.3% for women and 81.6% for men.  Utah is not exempt from this issue and in 2018, the Urban Indian Health Institute published a report about missing and murdered Indigenous women (MMIW) in U.S. urban areas that showed Salt Lake was among the top 10 cities with MMIW cases. In March 2020 Governor Hubert signed the bill that established the Utah MMIWG TAsk Force to look at the underlying causes and solutions, as well as to hear the stories from those who have lost loved ones. This presentation will discuss the issues that contribute to MMIRs, the role of the Utah TAsk Force, the impacts of trauma on Native individuals, families and communities and ways to support healing around the issue.

    This speaker will provide information which will allow participants to:

    1) Present the current state around Murdered & Missing Indigenous Women & Girls and the work assigned to the MMIWG Task Force; and,

    2) Evaluate the issues and assess the trauma of this population then design a treatment plan and identify the social justice needs.

  • UPDATES & BEST PRACTICES: EXPOSURE THERAPY IN 2021 – 9:15 – 10:15

    Tricia Page, CMHC

    Kate Rogers, PhD

    Exposure therapy has evolved quite a bit in the past 70 years, with substantial advances in research and practice within the past decade. This presentation will focus on the most recent shift in exposure therapy–a clinician’s ability to maximize exposure-based learning through a model of inhibitory learning. Intermediate to advanced practitioners with some basic knowledge of exposure therapy will benefit most from this presentation. This presentation will also address the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on effective application of exposure interventions. An update will also be provided of empirical support behind applying exposure therapy to a range of mental health diagnoses.

    After leaving this second presentation by this speaker, participants will be able to:

    1) Report on the latest findings around anxiety disorders and depression – from screening & assessment to pharmacologic and non-pharma treatments; and,

    2) Design treatment plans for individuals with various anxiety and/or depressive disorders which implement the modalities currently believed to be most effective.

  • ECT, TMS, AND KETAMINE: AN OVERVIEW OF THEIR USE IN PSYCHIATRY – 9:15 – 10:15

    Matthew Pierson, MD

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has a long history of use in psychiatry, while newer treatment such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and ketamine are becoming more widely recognized and used. This presentation will provide an overview of all three treatments, focusing on their administration and indications, as well as their effectiveness and side effects as supported by research and clinical experience. Dr. Pierson is a psychiatrist on faculty at the University of Utah and provides treatment with all three modalities in the Treatment-Resistant Mood Disorders clinic at the Huntsman Mental Health Institute. This presentation is intended for any practitioner interested in learning more about these treatments.

    Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Identify individuals who may benefit from the adjunct therapies demonstrated; and,

    2) Teach and apply the various adjunct therapies.

  • EXHIBITS & BREAK – 10:15-10:30

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 10:30-11:45

  • ANTI-SOCIAL PERSONALITY DISORDER- CONTROVERSIES ON ISSUES OF COMORBIDITY, TREATABILITY & SUCCESS – 10:30-11:45

    Tyler Durns, MD

    Paul Whitehead, MD

    Discuss the history, science, treatment approaches, efficacy, controversies, and systems handling of individuals with antisocial personality disorders (or limited features of psychopathy).

    After hearing this expert, participants will be able to:

    1) Discuss the history, science, treatment approaches, efficacy, controversies, and systems handling of individuals with antisocial personality disorders (or limited features of psychopathy); and,

    2) Debate the various theories as to the most effective ways to work with these individuals – from the judicial to the treatment systems.

  • COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY ETHICS & PITFALLS: CURRENT TRENDS & GUIDELINES – (.5 ETHICS CREDITS)   10:30-11:45

    Michael Negrette, LMFT

    Communication and digital technologies are evolving at a rapid pace and it is imperative that clinicians are up to date on current trends and ethical considerations of the technologies we employ in our clinical practice. This workshop will give attendees the most recent ethical updates and provide guidelines and information that will help clinicians navigate the digital arena. In addition to clinician specific issues, the workshop will provide helpful information and guidelines to assist clients who have presenting issues which involve communication technology, particularly adolescents and the use of social media, the amount of appropriate screen time, and other issues families contend with.

    After attending the session, participants will be able to:

    1) Present the most up to date ethical guidelines on the use of communication technology in clinical practice and the technical strategies to protect online privacy of clients engaging in tele-health activities; and,

    2) Demonstrate helpful hints and strategies to help clients who present with destresses involving cyber issues, particularly adolescents and social media.

  • CREATING EQUITABLE, EFFECTIVE & ETHICAL SERVICES FOR IMMIGRANT TRAUMA SURVIVORS – (1.25 ETHICS CREDITS, .25 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDITS)  – 10:30-11:45

    Karla Arroyo, LCSW

    After hearing this presentation, participations will be able to:

    1) Review the special needs and continuum of care needed by immigrants and their loved ones who have experienced trauma of any kind; and,

    2) Portray methods to coordinate this care equitably, effectively and ethically especially when unusual circumstances (i.e. involvement of undocumented individuals, special cultural needs, etc.) are present.

  • EXPERIENTIAL ESCAPE – 10:30-11:45
    These experiential sessions will provide registrants with opportunities to practice some common adjunct practices such as yoga, acupuncture, NLP, Rieke, et cetera.

  • 5-POINT AURICULAR ACUDETOX AS A COMPLEMENTARY TREATMENT FOR SUD – 10:30 – 11:05

    Amy de la Garza, MD

    Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Identify individuals who may benefit from the adjunct therapies demonstrated; and,

    2) Teach and apply the various adjunct therapies.

  • GENTLE FLOW YOGA – 11:05 – 11:40

    John Cottrell, PhD, ERYT-500, CYT

    Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Identify individuals who may benefit from the adjunct therapies demonstrated; and,

    2) Teach and apply the various adjunct therapies.

  • RADICAL HEALING – 10:30-11:45

    Hector Y. Adames, PsyD

    Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) TBA; and,

    2) TBA.

  • RESILIENCY-DEVELOPING IT, LIVING IT, & TEACHING IT – 10:30-11:45

    Marrette Monson, LCSW

    re sil ience /rzilyns/ 1. The capacity to recover quickly from difficulties; toughness. You know what is is, but how do you get it?

    Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Assess their own resilience as well as that of others and identify areas needing to be strengthened in order to develop more resilience; and,

    2) Teach others, of various ages, ways to increase their resilience in day-to-day life as well as during times of greater stress.

  • RETHINKING ADDICTION CARE WITH RECOVERYMIND TRAINING – 10:30-11:45

    Paul H. Earley, MD

    RecoveryMind Training (RMT) is a way of understanding addiction that is steeped in science and simultaneously respectful of the human condition. Addiction is a brain disease that produces wholesale changes in drives, intent, self-control, learning memory and even one’s world view. RecoveryMind Training combines the latest brain science with effective psychotherapy techniques and twelve-step philosophy. This information is collected into a cohesive treatment system with clear, measurable, and realizable goals.

    Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Describe a clear set of definitions and terms that clarify the illness, tasks and goals for addiction care; and,

    2) Outline the neural circuits that are commandeered by addiction to result in the characteristic thoughts, emotions and behaviors of the illness.

  • LUNCHBREAK W/ FEATURE SPEAKERS: 11:45-1:15

  • CYBERPSYCHOLOGY: PRESENT & FUTURE IMPACTS – (.5 ETHICS CREDITS)  12:00-1:00

    Julie Ancis, PhD

    The presenter will provide an overview and introduction to the discipline of cyberpsychology. Research and scholarship on the interaction of technology and human behavior through the lens of psychology has exploded, and relatedly the field of cyberpsychology. The internet has transformed social interactions, communication patters, and even our identities. Major areas and trands will be discussed. In addition, future directions in cyberpsychology as it relates to ethics, clinical work, education and training, and research will be presented.

    After attending the session, participants will be able to:

    1) Learn the major areas in the interdisciplinary field of cyberpsychology impacting present and future behavior; and,

    2) Understand the applications of cyberpsychology to psychological practice, education and training, research, and ethics.

  • SAVE THE INDIAN, SAVE THE MAN: A SOCIAL JUSTICE PERSPECTIVE ON SUICIDE PREVENTION – (1 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDIT)  12:00-1:00

    Shelby Rowe, MBA

    After over 500 years of attempted extermination of the Indigenous peoples of America, we are still here, fully aware of the perceived inconvenience of our survival. The speaker will challenge the audience to once and for all abandon the policy of “Kill the Indian, Save the Man.” Instead, saving the Indian could quite possibly Save Mankind. This presentation will intertwine music, art and humor to address the serious issues that have increased risk of suicide among American Indians – genocide, colonization & ongoing systemic oppression on suicide risk among Indigenous peoples in the US. The speaker will also talk about the Indigenous Renaissance that is currently taking place in the US, and discuss how embracing Indigenous culture could be a key to reducing suicide risk.

    After attending the session, participants will be able to:

    1) Investigate the inequities related to suicide prevention efforts among Native American populations; and,

    2) Assist individuals to focus on their strengths and resiliency to reconnect with their own spirits in a healing journey.

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 1:15 – 2:30

  • LAUGH OUT LOUD: THE ROLE OF HUMOR IN MENTAL HEALTH – (.25 ETHICS CREDITS)  1:15 – 2:30

    Benjamin D. Christiansen, PsyD

    Given the chaos of mental health, self-care, and an ever increasing need to provide emotional structure and support in humanistic manners, this breakout session will explore the use and value of humor and laughter in the therapeutic environment.

    After gleaning information from this representative, participants will be able to:

    1) Explore the use of humor in mental health interventions, assessments, and coping skills; and,

    2) Explore the value of humor and laughter in self-care as mental health providers.

  • LGBTQIA+ ETHICAL BEST PRACTICE IN MENTAL HEALTH TREATMENT – (1.25 ETHICS CREDITS, .5 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDITS)     1:15 – 2:30

    Amanda Darrow, MEd

    Kortni Rae Darrow, BS, MA

    Kelsey Kehoe, BA

    LGBTQIA+ Ethical Best Practice in Residential Treatment Center will outline best practices when working with the LGBTQIA+ community as patients. This workshop will include LGBTQIA+ inclusion in the setting and treatment, honoring and respecting patient choice, inclusive policies, and how to establish healthy and equitable treatment in Residential and other settings.

    Participants in this session will leave able to:

    1) Outline common best practices when working with individuals with issues of sexual orientation and/or gender identity. This shall include, but not be limited to honoring patient choice, applying the most recent changes in medical practice rules, and establishing healthy and equitable treatment venues (residential to outpatient); and,

    2) Report on some of the common ethical issues confronting clinicians who work with these populations as well as suggested methods to insure that these issues are handled in the most efficacious and ethical ways. This may include, but not be limited to treatment of minors whose parents / guardians do not support the patient’s choices.

  • OOPS – I DID IT AGAIN? APPLYING TRANSCRANIAL MAGNETIC STIMULATION TO THE MPFC TO DECREASE RELAPSE – 1:15 – 2:30

    Colleen A. Hanlon, PhD

    The last 20 years of human and animal research have taught us that addiction is a brain disease. The behaviors that govern the relapse process are modifiable through modulation of the medial prefrontal cortex. This has been clearly demonstrated in animals, and now – through the use of non-invasive brain stimulation techniques such as transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) it may be possible in our patients as well. In this talk we will review what is known, what is yet unknown, and where the field of non-invasive brain stimulation therapeutics for substance use disorders is going.

    After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) List at least 2 strategies which are being explored as targets for TMS addiction treatment; and,

    2) List the indications for which TMS is currently approved – including smoking cessation.

  • SETTING ASIDE BIAS & JUDGEMENT TO PROVIDE ETHICAL COUPLE’S THERAPY – (1.25 ETHICS CREDIT)  1:15 – 2:30

    Susanna Carlson, LCSW, AASECT

    We explore the importance and benefits of judgment-free couples therapy as it effects the wellbeing of our clients and we discuss ways to identify our own biases impeding our work with couples. As professionals it is our responsibility to assist our clients in the exploration of their beliefs about intimacy, sexuality, and power dynamics. We will discuss how to perform couples therapy that most effectively supports the individuals in the couple and helps resolve issues beyond the presenting problem. We can learn to view the cognitive dissonance our clients experience following their individual moral compass and belief systems as a way to promote their personal healing while reconciling the conflicts this creates in a couple.

    After hearing these two experts, participants will be able to:

    1) Explore the benefit of ethical couples therapy as it effects the wellbeing of clients and learn to identify their own biases and values getting in the way of efficient/ productive couples therapy and discuss the most difficult topics showing up; and

    2) Participants will challenge their perspectives, paradigms, and lenses in order to aid in the creation of partner therapy that is inclusive, science-friendly, diverse, and just, while learning to avoid causing them.

  • TRANSITIONING FROM INCARCERATION: SUPPORTING SUCCESS IN THE COMMUNITY – 1:15 – 2:30

    Laura Andelin, SSW

    Tiffany Flygare

    Mark S. Manazer, PhD

    Successful transition from incarceration back into the community is a process that can be supported by the timely application of a number of direct techniques. These include the early evaluation of the individuals mental health status, coordination of resources in the community (i.e. housing, treatment, employment etc.) review of criminogenic risk factors, and establishing the correct level of wrap-around services. This presentation will review several approaches to supporting successful transition for individuals with co-occurring disorders with a focus on individuals with Severe Mental Illness.

    As a result of participating in this program, participants will be able to:

    1) Review successful transition from incarceration back into the community. How to support the timely application of a number of direct techniques; and,

    2) Outline the specific techniques including early evaluation of the individual’s mental health status, coordination of resources in the community, review of criminogenic risk factors, and establish the correct level of wrap-around services. Also a review of several approaches to support successful transition for individual with co-occurring disorders with a focus on the individuals with Severe Mental Illness.

  • USING TECHNOLOGY TO ENHANCE ACCEPTANCE & COMMITMENT THERAPY – 1:15 – 2:30

    Michael Levin, PhD

    Mobile apps and websites offer a promising way to teach psychological skills in a self-guided format that can increase access to evidence-based treatments as a stand-alone or adjunct to treatment. Research on the use of these technologies to deliver Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has grown rapidly over the past few years. This presentation will explore how ACT-related apps and websites can be used to help clients become more mindful, accepting of difficult thoughts and feelings, and to clarify and move towards what matters most to them. Research will be reviewed to not only highlight the efficacy of these programs, but also to identify challenges and opportunities for their use in clinical practice. For example, we will explore how apps might be used as a resource for clients waiting to start services, as an adjunct to enhance therapy, and as a broader service to increase access to mental health resources to those not receiving treatment. Challenges related to engaging users in technology and evidence-based strategies to enhance, uptake & adherence will be reviewed. Attendees will also learn about specific technologies that are available to use in their practice.

    After listening to this expert, participants will be able to:

    1) Update others on the latest findings with Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT) including related technologies and adjunctive self-guided supports via AI; and,

    2) Distinguish the benefits and common barriers / pitfalls of these apps and similar technological advances available, and being developed, for the treatment of behavioral health disorders.

  • YOU’RE KILLING ME, ALZ! A PSYCHOLOGIST’S TAKE ON WORKING WITH ALZHEIMERS DISEASE WHILE CAREGIVING FOR A LOVED ONE SUFFERING FROM IT – (.25 ETHICS CREDITS)      1:15 – 2:30

    Lyndsey Evans, PhD

    This presentation will review the latest research within the field of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), while focusing on the screening, identification, and prognosis of individuals with this disease. It will also include resources regarding the care and support for patients with AD and their caregivers. A special emphasis will be given to the unique challenges faced by mental health providers who work with and caregive for victims of this disease.

    As a result of attending this session, participants will be able to:

    1) Review the latest research within the field of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), while focusing on the screening, identification, and prognosis of individuals with the disease; and,

    2) Discussion on the included resources regarding the care and support for patients with AD and their caregivers. A special emphasis will be given to the unique challenges faced by mental health providers who work with and care-give for victims of this disease.

  • EXHIBITS & BREAK – 2:30 – 2:45

  • CONCURRENT SESSIONS – 2:45 – 4:00

  • CHARTING LIKE A CHAMP: UNDERSTANDING THE PRINCIPLES, RATIONALE, AND ETHICS OF GOOD DOCUMENTATION – (1.25 ETHICS CREDITS)    2:45 – 4:00

    Michael Tragakis, PhD

    Documentation in health care is one of the “necessary evils” of the profession – we cannot get paid or justify our treatment plans unless services are documented. Given the time demands in clinical work, however, charting can often be very brief and may not consider all the audiences that might access the medical record. Further, we may not have had guidance in our practical training experiences about how to chart in a concise, yet complete and ethically-sound manner. This presentation will help you “chart like a champ”, understanding key principles and components of excellent documentation.

    After listening to this speaker, participants will leave able to:

    1) Provide an inventory of the rationale and ethics of good documentation, along with the general principles of defensible and useful charting; and,

    2) Show clarity with regard to specific components of documentation to meet Medicaid guidelines and incorporate multiple “audiences” and specific populations when charting.

  • EXPERIENTIAL ESCAPE – 2:45 – 4:00
    These experiential sessions will provide registrants with opportunities to practice some common adjunct practices such as yoga, acupuncture, NLP, Rieke, et cetera.

    After participating, attendees will be able to:

    1) Identify individuals who may benefit from the adjunct therapies demonstrated; and,

    2) Teach and apply the various adjunct therapies.

  • FAMILIES IN TRANSITION: THE EXPERIENCES OF PARENTS OF TRANS KIDS – (.5 ETHICS CREDITS, .5 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDITS)    2:45 – 4:00

    Alli Martin, EdD; & Panel

    This presentation will be a panel discussion with parents of trans kids. We will focus discussion on the experiences of parents, their perceptions of their kids’ needs, how a child’s gender journey impacts their family, what supports families could use, and parents’ experiences with their child’s mental health care provider(s).

    After leaving this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Identify common needs of individuals at various stages of gender transition; and,

    2) Provide education and other tools for loved ones supporting these individuals through all stages of transitions.

  • LIVE ON! LEVERAGING THE POWER OF PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERS TO DEVELOP A STATEWIDE SUICIDE PREVENTION CAMPAIGN – (1 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDITS)    2:45 – 4:00

    Alison Foust, MHA

    While suicide is a significant public health problem in Utah, it is also preventable. Unfortunately, the problem is often addressed in silos, with different groups focusing on different parts of the problem. To more effectively reduce the rising rate of suicide, Utah’s public health officials brought together key partners: private companies, religious organizations, health care systems, and academics–and combined their knowledge and influence with the reach of a media campaign. This presentation will focus on the power of these partnerships, the collaborative development of a suicide prevention campaign, and the importance of evaluation.

    Once participants have completed this session, they will be able to:

    1) Present effective communication strategies for suicide prevention and how to use these strategies to build awareness for this critical public health issue; and,

    2) Describe the role evaluation plays in suicide prevention activities and present findings from a statewide household survey issued in April 2020 measuring social norms surrounding mental health and suicide prevention.

  • PREVENTING BURNOUT: MINDFULNESS PRACTICES FOR SELF-CARE – (.5 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDITS)    2:45 – 4:00

    Paul Thielking, MD

    This session will involve the following:

    1. Introduction of concepts and definitions including burnout, compassion fatigue, secondary trauma, and moral distress.
    2. Review of some of the literature regarding prevalence of burnout in healthcare professionals.
    3. Review of evidence based interventions that can help relieve burnout, including mindfulness based interventions.
    4. Discussion of mindfulness: definitions, brief history of mindfulness in healthcare, review of possible benefits of mindfulness practices.
    5. Experiential Activity: we will do a few different guided mindfulness exercises, including brief mindfulness practices that can be incorporated into a busy work routine.

    After hearing from this specialist, participants will be able to:

    1) Explain concepts and definitions including: burnout, compassion fatigue, secondary trauma, moral distress, and burnout; and,

    2) Practice three guided mindfulness exercises during the experiential segment of the course.

  • PRIMARY CARE-BASED SYRINGE EXCHANGE SERVICES: HARM REDUCTION FOR PEOPLE WHO USE DRUGS (PWUDs)   2:45 – 4:00

    Paula Cook, MD

    Corey Orndorff, EMT-B

    As the first clinic to implement syringe exchange services in Utah, Martindale Clinic will present their preliminary information on the incorporation of expanded harm reduction services for patients and community members at a primary care facility. These new clinic services include sterile syringes and injection materials, safer injection education, naloxone kits for overdose reversal, and safer sex supplies, offered in complement to existing services of MOUD, PEP/PrEP, hormonal contraception, Hep C treatment, etc. Listeners will understand the need for harm reduction philosophy in the treatment of PWUDs, the processes by which syringe exchange can be incorporated into traditional healthcare settings, and the impact of syringe exchange services on patient care through case studies and initial data analysis.

    Once participants have completed this session, they will be able to:

    1) Describe the evidence, efficacy, and need for expanded harm reduction programs in clinical settings; and,

    2) Discuss implementation and findings of harm reduction and syringe exchange services embedded in a local primary care/addiction clinic.

  • PSYCHEDELIC-ASSISTED PSYCHOTHERAPIES FOR MENTAL HEALTH – 2:45 – 4:00

    Kevin Byrne, MD

    As a result of attending this session, participants will be able to:

    1) Trace the historical use of psychedelics to their current (and under-investigation) uses in mental health; describe the use, indications, contra-indications and expected outcomes from these treatment modalities; and,

    2) Describe the potential role for multi-disciplinary teams to support these interventions for maximum potential.

  • WORKING WITH COUPLES ON THEIR OWN “SEXUAL-NORMS” – (1 ETHICS CREDIT)   2:45 – 4:00

    Susanna Carlson, LCSW, AASECT

    Clinicians need to be ready to discuss the many nuances of fidelity agreements, the purposes they serve, and how to help couples negotiate effective, adaptive, and sustainable agreements. The awareness of our own biases and assumptions as well as distinguishing the differences between sexual expression and intimacy will assist us in respecting our clients’ beliefs, values, and decision making regarding sexual behaviors, sexual health, and sexual identities. We can begin by recognizing how these new options fit into our clients’ sex lives and relationships to gain a better understanding of how these influence the clinical setting.

    Upon completion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    1) Individually screen and assess couples for relationship traumas and other issues – past present; then,

    2) Provide couples’ therapy in ways which most effectively support the individuals and help resolve presenting issues even in cases which conflict with their own belief systems.

  • MARK PAYNE KEYNOTE: THE HEALTH & MENTAL HEALTH BENEFITS OF HUMOR – 4:10 – 5:00

    Robert Kirby, Columnist

    Back by popular demand, this local celebrity shares humor as a life skill in times of stress and sorrow. By using this life skill one will discover that Humor is nature’s own coping mechanism.

    After attending the session, participants will be able to:

    1) Explain humor as a life skill in times of stress and sorrow; and,

    2) Demonstrate the use of humor in the therapeutic setting while staying within the scope of practice and ethical standards.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 5TH

CLICK SESSION FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

  • OPTIONAL POST-CONFERENCE MASTER WORKSHOPS

  • BEYOND CULTURAL COMPETENCY: CLINICAL, ETHICAL, & PROFESSIONAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR MENTAL HEALTH EQUITY IN BLACK COMMUNITIES – (3.5 ETHICS CREDITS, 1 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDITS)     8:00 – 12:15  (4 HOURS TOTAL CREDIT)

    Kimberly Applewhite, PsyD – Utah Center for Evidence Based Treatment

    Racially traumatic and stressful events that have occurred in recent years, most immediately highlighted by the death of George Floyd and others and subsequent protests around the country, illuminate the importance of ethical and clinical understanding of the continued effects of racism on mental health. Clinicians and therapists of all disciplines commit to increasing their knowledge and skill with regard to care of different cultures, as well as to uphold principles of diversity and equity in their fields. This workshop will explore ethical commitments to cultural sensitivity and humility, provide training on common diversity and equity-related terminology, discuss assessment and evaluation of racial stress and trauma, and review evidence-based practices in clinical care.

    This behavioral specialist will provide information which will allow participants to:

    1) Exercise understanding of ethical issues relating to cultural sensitivity and equity in their clinical profession; and,

    2) Demonstrate knowledge of culturally sensitive/humble clinical assessment/intervention methods.

  • KEEPING INDIVIDUALS ALIVE: MEANS SAFETY COUNSELING FOR SUICIDE PREVENTION – (3 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDITS)   8:00 – 12:00  (3 HOURS TOTAL CREDIT)

    Kent D. Hinkson Jr., MS

    Working with individuals who are struggling with suicidal ideation and/or behaviors can be stressful. One of the more difficult parts of working with patients in these areas is having a meaningful and positive conversation about access to lethal means, while maintaining a good relationship with your client/patient. This workshop will discuss how to broach the subject with your client/patient in a non-confrontational approach, provide you with the knowledge and introduction to the skills that will allow you to engage with your client/patient and their support to reduce and/or eliminate access to lethal means as much as possible. Cultural considerations will be discussed in depth regarding firearms, especially within the context of clients/patients that are generally reluctant to talk about removing firearms from the home (e.g. conservatives, military servicemembers and veterans, first responders, etc.)

    After hearing from this specialist, participants will be able to:

    1) Identify people who could benefit from lethal-means counseling; and,

    2) Work with individuals and families to reduce access to lethal-means and provide them the education and tools to carry these practices forward.

  • CT-R – 1:00 – 4:30  (3 HOURS TOTAL CREDIT)

    Aaron Brinen, PsyD, PA/TN – Vanderbilt University Medical Center

    *Please note this program will be offered in a virtual format, not live.

    Recovery-oriented cognitive therapy (CT-R) for serious mental illness is an empirically-supported treatment that operationalizes recovery and resiliency in a collaborative way. This INTRODUCTORY workshop will introduce through lecture and video the basic protocol of CT-R and how to start using it. CT-R applies across the range of severity, and includes a way to understand the challenges (low energy, disorganization, grandiosity, hallucinations, aggression, self-injury, etc.) that can keep them from engaging and getting the life of their choosing, along with strategies for action to promote that life to its fullest.

    Once participants have attended this program, they will leave able to:

    1) List the three stages of the basic protocol for Recovery Oriented CT; and,

    2) Explain the relationship between beliefs and negative symptoms of schizophrenia.

  • FREEDOM FROM SURVIVAL MODE: USING EVIDENCE-BASED ASSESSMENT AND INTERVENTION TO IDENTIFY POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS AND FREE CLIENTS FROM UNRELENTING CRISIS – (1 SUICIDE PREVENTION CREDIT)    12:30 – 5:00  (4 HOURS TOTAL CREDIT)

    Sheila E. Crowell, PhD – Utah Center for Evidence Based Treatment

    Laura Rowley, PhD, LP – Utah Center for Evidence Based Treatment

    Shelle Welty, PsyD – Utah Center for Evidence Based Treatment

    This presentation will provide guidance for the assessment and treatment of traumatized adults. Evidence based assessments and treatment modalities will be reviewed with case study material to illustrate applications. Special attention will be given to cultural considerations in trauma treatment. In addition, there will be training in suicide prevention as applicable to this population.

    As a result of attending this session, participants will be able to:

    1) Present the practices of EMDR and Non-EMDR for trauma; and,

    2) Demonstrate both types of practices for trauma.

  • *Inclusion of faculty and content does not imply real or perceived endorsement by event hosts, partners, CE providers, organizers, planners, or any other parties affiliated with this event.

Recent Comments
    Archives
    Categories
    • No categories
    Event Search

    You should choose a search result page. You can choose the page from the Theme Options > Events > Event Search Results Page option.

    Ads
    Latest Events