Conference Agenda

Monday - MAY 6, 2024

EXHIBITS & BREAK (9:50)

EXHIBITS & BREAK (11:15)

LUNCHON (12:45)

EXHIBITS & BREAK (3:00)

Tuesday, MAY 7 - 2024

CHECK-IN, EXHIBITS & CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST (7:30 - 8:00)

PLENARY: THE POWER OF ‘I AM ENOUGH’: A GUIDE TO UNIQUENESS IN LIVED EXPERIENCE
STORIES [.25 Ethics Credit] 8:00 - 9:00 (1.0 Hr)

Marriam Oliver

“The Power of ‘I Am Enough’: A Guide to Uniqueness in Lived Stories’ is a transformative exploration of self-worth and individuality within the intricate navigation of life. My story hopes to illuminate the journey of embracing the mantra ‘I Am Enough’ as a catalyst for understanding and celebrating the distinctiveness of personal narratives. Through insightful reflections and practical wisdom, in hopes the audience gains greater understanding of lived experiences as an offering that each individual in the criminal justice is truly unique in their experience and ‘Enough’ to heal and conquer the things ahead by using a multiple of tools to address needs and strengths.

At the end of this special presentation, you will be able to:

  1. Trace the common path for individuals involved in both the behavioral health and justice systems to identify the gaps, strengths, and weaknesses of these systems individually and combined; and,
  2. Suggest ways to improve these systems and change the perspectives and interventions of the professionals in each system to ethically improve your daily practices and, ultimately, the short and long -term outcomes of clients.
EXHIBITS & BREAK (9:00 – 9:15)

CONCURRENT SESSIONS (9:15 - 10:30) (1.25 Hrs/Each)

15+ THINGS MILITARY VETERANS WANT YOU TO KNOW

Lisa D. Duckworth, MSML, SPHR

15+ Things Veterans Want You To Know, developed at the PsychArmor Institute, is the cornerstone course for military culture education and was created to help educate anyone who works with, lives with, or cares for our military service members, Veterans and their families. This special version of 15 Things, presented by Army Chaplain’s Assistant veteran, Lisa Duckworth, focuses on the most important factors for them to understand to provide outstanding care to our country’s Veterans. 15 Things is military culture in the form of a soldier’s stories brought to life (with lots of humor) and will change the way you interact with those who wear or once wore our country’s uniform.

This course will teach you 5 questions you should always ask veterans, 1 question you should never ask veterans, and 15 facts that will make you more culturally competent.

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Name three questions you should ask a Veteran to learn more about his/her experience in the military as well as the one question you should never ask; and,
  2. Explore some of the challenges faced by family members of miliary personnel.
ASAM EVOLUTION: EMBRACING THE FOURT EDITION IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH PRACTICE

Amy Buehler, LCSW

This training is for all experience levels of attendees. The purpose of this presentation is to explore why we use tools like the ASAM in practice, to identify and explain key changes and updates in the fourth edition of the ASAM Criteria and discuss strategies for implementing the use of the new criteria into our programs and practices.

As a result of hearing from this practitioner, you will be able to:

  1. Outline ASAM’s Updated Criteria and innovations in levels of care and continuum management; and,
  2. Meet challenges and successfully implement the 4TH addition of the ASAM Criteria.
PRACTICAL ACT THERAPY SKILLS WORKSHOP [Not Available Virtually]

Nate Hadley, PhD, LCSW

Improve your therapeutic practice effectiveness by learning practice skills based on the core principles of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). The workshop will involve hands-on, experiential learning, focusing on real-world applications and equipping mental health professionals with actionable skills to enhance client outcomes. From mindfulness techniques and values clarification to cognitive defusion and commitment strategies, this workshop is a practical guide for those seeking to integrate ACT skills seamlessly into their practice.

 More specifically, after this session, you will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate key therapeutic concepts of ACT therapy and show how they can be applied in clinical practice with their respective client populations; and,
  2. Demonstrate in-person practice ACT therapy skills and techniques that can be implemented in their clinical practice.
WHAT’S EATING YOU? USING DBT & ACT INTERVENTIONS TO TREAT EATING DISORDERS

Marie Meintanis, MEd, LCPC, C-DBT

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Recognize and provide a differential diagnosis of eating disorders in adult generations and show how they commonly present and evolve at various stages and ages; then,
  2. Discuss common etiological paths of eating disorders across family lines and discuss treatment options for various clients based upon history, development, presentation, status, et cetera
CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE APPROACHES & INTERVENTIONS FOR LGBTQ+ INDIVIDUALS
[1.25 Ethics Credit; .25 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Jules Martinez, LCSW, CPSS

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to;

  1. Outline and discuss the considerations of LGBTQ+ individuals in justice and treatment settings including, but not limited to, placement factors, safety measures, evidence-based practices, organization/system policy development, political climates, bouncing between gender-affirming care and non-gender affirming institutions; and,
  2. Take measures to implement ethically and legally compliant care in various settings and levels of care and advocate for this population around said issues, changing laws and social policies
THE USE OF SUPERVISION FEES IN PROBATION: A NATIONAL STUDY

Megan Foster, MSW

Community supervision fees are collected by agencies across the country to supplement strapped local and state budgets. The role of these fees play in agency budgets varies dramatically across jurisdictions. The Utah Criminal Justice Center (UCJC), in collaboration with the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Association of Probation Executives (NAPE), conducted interviews with probation executives across the U.S. to determine how fees drive agency budgets and how some states have moved away from the practice. The current presentation will provide an overview of how fees are used across the U.S., how policies affect agencies and staff, and how policies have changed in some states.

After attending this presentation, you will be able to:

  1. TBA
  2. TBA
UNVEILING THE HUMAN STORIES: JUSTICE & MENTAL HEALTH IN THE BEEHIVE STATE [Not Available Virtually]

Destiny Garcia; Brock M. Smith, CSW, SASUDC; Amy Daeschel, CASUDC; John Mike Mireles

Increasingly, practitioners and researchers have identified the limits of using recidivism, as characterized in criminal justice data, as the sole measure of success for the criminal justice system. In part, such measures tend to obfuscate the experience, including successes and hardships, of individuals as they seek to reintegrate after justice-system contact. The National Academies of Science have recently called for the criminal justice system to re-conceptualize its definition of post-release success to account for individual well-being, the criminalization of poverty and substance use, and the adequacy of social and material support. This panel will feature three formerly justice-involved individuals discussing their path to post-release success, including supports, barriers, and the criminal justice system's role in promoting and inhibiting outcomes.

Upon completion of this panel presentation, you will gleam information to:

  1. Characterize the experiences of individuals who have successfully exited the criminal or juvenile justice system, including those programs, services, or individuals that supported that transition; and,
  2. Identify the mechanisms through which the criminal justice and behavior health systems both support and interrupt efforts toward well-being and cessation of criminal behavior and brainstorm ideas for closing these gaps, improving services, and reducing recidivism.
THE MAGIC OF COLLECTIVE HEALING: DEMYSTIFYING GROUP THERAPY PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES [.25 Ethics Credit]

Hans R. Watson, DO

After leaving this popular speaker, you will be able to:

  1. Trace the practices of group therapy and teach others about the principles behind the practice; and,
  2. Desing a group therapy plan which incorporates the accepted and ethical principles and concepts which lead to its effectiveness.
FROM SELF-HARM TO SELF-COMPASSION: PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS & CHALLENGES IN WORKING WITH ADULTS THAT SELF-HARM [1.0 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Ashley Dahl, PsyD, LCPC

Once you attend this session, you will leave able to:

    1. Discuss the development of self-harm behaviors, identify signs and symptoms of self-harm, and explore unique challenges that may arise in clinical practice; and,
    2. Recognize and apply interventions and treatments that can help reduce self-harm behaviors with a special focus on how to tailor your approach with various clients.
EXHIBITS & BREAK (10:30 – 10:45)

CONCURRENT SESSIONS (10:45 – 12:00) (1.25 Hrs/Each)

LIGHTNING ROUND: UPDATED PTSD TREATMENT GUIDELINES, INNOVATIONS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS [0.25 Suicide Prev. Credits]

Thomas Mullin, PhD; Sebastian Kreitschitz, MD, FAPA; Jonathan Codell, PhD; Jennifer Romesser, PsyD; Dianna Fuessel-Herrmann, BS; Lauren Thurgood, BS

The assessment and treatment of PTSD continues to evolve in the context of practice and research. This series of lightning round talks will survey the major changes in treatment practice guidelines for PTSD. This includes updates about first line and emerging treatments, including Models of Accelerated Service Delivery (MASD), medication management, and complementary and integrative interventions. This presentation will also include presentation of the emerging body of research for MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. Finally, the panel will talk about exciting new research that may usher in new and adapted treatments which include Stellate Ganglion Blocks (SGB) and a dismantling study of Cognitive Processing Therapy.

As a result of participating in this Lightning Round, you will be able to:

  1. Outline the recently updated evidence-based treatment guidelines for PTSD as documented in the VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines, with an emphasis on first line treatments, and;
  2. Introduce updated practices of Models of Accelerated Service Delivery (MASD) for Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure Therapy for the treatment of PTSD.
UNLOCKING STRENGTH & UNITY IN THE AFTERMATH OF AN ORGANIZATIONAL TRAUMA [0.25 Suicide Prevention Hours]

Laura Bradbury, LCSW; Katherine P. Supiano, PhD, LCSW, F-GSA, FT, APHSW-C

Mental Health Clinicians practice in settings with vulnerable clients (risk of suicide death/overdose death/premature death) and may also be called upon to support community programs and services that are impacted by organizational trauma. In this session we will present best practices and practical approaches to addressing a variety of adverse workplace events, in both preventive and responsive ways that foster compassion and team support.

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Trace the development of some common occurrences in an organization and their staff following a trauma; and,
  2. Develop and implement plans in all departments of an organization to lessen the negative sequela of a trauma and best support all levels of employees and partners.
BEHIND THE MASK: UNDERSTANDING & ENGAGING INDIVIDUALS WITH ANTISOCIAL PERSONALITY DISORDER

Ashley C. T. Jones, PhD

Mental Health Clinicians practice in settings with vulnerable clients (risk of suicide death/overdose death/premature death) and may also be called upon to support community programs and services that are impacted by organizational trauma. In this session we will present best practices and practical approaches to addressing a variety of adverse workplace events, in both preventive and responsive ways that foster compassion and team support.

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Present the tools used for a differential diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and discuss the differences between similarly presenting disorders; and,
  2. Demonstrate some of the treatment modalities - pharm and non-pharm, and outline their expected outcomes, course of treatment, family support components, and other aspects.
DISMANTLING INJUSTICE: EXPLORING THE CRUCIAL NEXUS BETWEEN SYSTEMIC RACISM & BIAS
IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH TREATMENT [1.25 Ethics Credit]

Sherra’ Watkins, PhD, CMHC-S, LCAS, CCS, CRC, BC-TMH

Join us in this thought-provoking workshop as we delve into the intricate relationship between systemic racism and bias within the realm of behavioral health treatment. This session aims to unravel the complexities, foster awareness, and ignite conversations that contribute to positive change in the pursuit of equitable and unbiased healthcare practices. Engage in open dialogue with expert facilitators, sharing real-world scenarios to deepen your understanding of the challenges faced by marginalized communities in behavioral health settings. Walk away with practical insights and a commitment to contribute to a more just and compassionate future in behavioral healthcare.

 

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will leave able to:

  1. Trace the historical roots and structural foundations of systemic racism and bias in the context of behavioral health treatment and explore the intersections of race, bias, and systemic structures, emphasizing how they manifest in behavioral health settings and impact patient experiences; and,
  2. Implement strategies and tools to dismantle biases and promote inclusive, equitable, and culturally competent behavioral health treatment approaches.
CAN AN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE BE USED TO TREAT A HUMAN MIND? [1.25 Ethics Credit]

Brandon Amacher

This presentation will cover the basics of Artificial Intelligence and discuss how AI is impacting mental health and how it can be used in the treatment of mental health. Additionally, ethical and security concerns surrounding AI will be discussed.

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Trace the various treatment modalities commonly used for mood disorders – including their indications, expected outcomes, red flags, contraindications, mechanism of action, et cetera; and,
  2. Outline some of the newer modalities in use and/or in research for treatment resistant disorders. This shall include but not be limited to indications, expected outcomes, contraindications and red flags, proper and improper use, trends, roles of treatment team members, et cetera.
ISOLATION & ITS IMPACTS ON THOSE WITH MENTAL HEALTH AND/OR ADDICTION ISSUES,
OLDER ADULTS, SMI, & OTHER POPULATIONS [Not Available Virtually]

Steven G. Sugden, MD, MPH, MSS

Recently, the U.S. Surgeon General brought attention to the impact of the epidemic of loneliness. This presentation will focus on the impact of loneliness on mental health, the neuroplastic sequelae, and potential solutions. The presentation is targeted for all participating.

 

Once you have attended this workshop, you will be able to:

1) Compare the positive and negative causes and consequences of isolation on various populations and cite research findings on this topic; and,

2) Address these issues (i.e. loss of support systems, loneliness and boredom triggers, and reduced access to resources) in the design of treatment plans at all levels of care

JUSTICE-INVOLVED ADULTS AS A VULNERABLE POPULATION – ENSURING ETHICAL
PRACTICE [1.25 Ethics Credit]

Jessica Seawright, CSW; Rhiannon McDaniel, CSW

Justice-involved adults are a vulnerable population that mental and behavioral health practitioners serve in a variety of systems. Working with this complex population offers a challenge to practitioners to understand and build competence to ensure we promote dignity and worth of the person, prioritize human relationships and promote social justice. This session will offer current research and practices to support your work with justice-involved adults, their families, and broader communities.

 

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

1) Conduct (or appropriately refer clients for) criminogenic risk assessments and use these results to design and implement ethically sound intervention plans; and,

2) Use this data, current research, and best practices to design programs and provide ethically sound services to justice-involved adults

DIVERSION & COLLABORATION: CREATIVE SOLUTIONS FOR COMPLEX CONCERNS

Nichole Cunha, LCSW

Often times, mental health and law enforcement professionals view crises scenarios through a "confinement lens"; challenging least restrictive principles and limiting client stabilization and resilience through the perception that safe environments must have locked doors or involuntary holds. This perspective is often compounded by classifications of "mentally ill", "behavioral" or "criminal", resulting in siloed approaches to supporting shared clientele. Attendees will understand their role in challenging stigma, supporting people in crisis through least restrictive principles, and apply knowledge to guide their treatment and community interactions.

As a result of joining this session, you will leave able to:

  1. Explore the commonalities between roles of law enforcement, legal defenders, and treatment providers and how to de-silo interactions through community-based approaches; and,
  2. Review the Receiving Center model as an example of a program that embodies least restrictive principles, coordinated care, and calls attendees to take action in their professional work.
FROM THEORY TO THERAPY – GROUPWORK IN ACTION [Not Available Virtually]

Hans R. Watson, DO

After attending this presentation, you will be able to:

1) Translate the principles and concepts of group therapy into practice and demonstrate their uses; and,

2) Evaluate a group therapy session and adjust its directions to be most effective for the various participants.

LUNCH FOODTRUCKS & FUN (12:00 - 1:15) on your own

(ON YOUR OWN)

CONCURRENT SESSIONS (1:15 - 2:30) (1.25 Hrs/Each)

UNRAVELING RESILIENCE: APPLYING POLYVAGAL TECHNIQUES IN TRAUMA INTERVENTION [Not Available Virtually]

Magenta Silberman

In this presentation, we will review the foundational concepts of polyvagal theory and explore practical applications of polyvagal techniques. By the end of this presentation, you will understand the polyvagal conceptualization of trauma responses and acquire techniques to integrate into your therapeutic practice.

Once you and others have attended this session, you will be able to:

  1. Assess individuals for trauma, trauma responses, and nervous system involvement; and,
  2. Apply trauma treatment using polyvagal theory and interventions and track process to adjust these interventions as needed for the most significant and long-term success.
LEGACIES OF TRAUMA & TRADITIONS OF RESILIENCE

Elizabeth A. Shelton, LCSW; Jerad Todacheenie, LCSW

This session will provide a brief introduction to epigenetics and generational trauma, the negative effects on populations, specifically Utah Native populations; and treatments that have shown promise in building resilience and reclaiming identify.

Once you have attended this session, you’ll be able to:

  1. Explain how generational trauma is forged through historical tragedy and current policy; then,
  2. Apply techniques to help individuals in mental health and justice settings with general trauma to build resilience through cultural identity and narrative.
HEALING THE HIDDEN WOUND: UNDERSTANDING & TREATING MORAL INJURY [.25 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Kent D. Hinkson Jr., PhD; Malisa M. Brooks, PhD

Join us for a discussion of the existing and emerging world of Moral Injury and the Potentially Morally Injurious Events (PMIEs) from which it often develops. First, a conversation around "What Moral Injury and how do we recognize it?" will be had, followed by a presentation on differential diagnosis, measurement, and treatment. Additionally, we'll talk about organization contexts from law enforcement and first responders, military personnel and veterans, and healthcare. Finally, much-needed attention will be spent on how you--as the clinician or provider--may be experiencing moral injury in your job.

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Recognize and provide a differential diagnosis and assessment of moral injuries in various individuals and recognize when your work circumstances in health and/or behavioral health care may have created the same issues; and,
  2. Apply the techniques and treatment modalities believed to be most effective for individuals with moral injury.
KETAMINE: HARNESSING POTENTIAL WHILE BALANCING RISK & REWARD [.25 Ethics Credit]

Wendy A. Johnson, PMHNP-BC

Beginning with an overview of ketamine’s medical history and its traditional use as an anesthetic, this lecture will then delve into the groundbreaking research and clinical trials that have uncovered the potential benefits of ketamine in treating mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, and PTSD. Emphasis is placed on the delicate balance required to harness these benefits effectively while managing the associated risks.

Upon completion of this session, you will be able to:

  1. Provide a brief overview of ketamine, including its history and pharmacological mechanism; and,
  2. Examine current research demonstrating the therapeutic potential of ketamine in treating mental health conditions as well as discuss potential risks and side effects associated with ketamine use.
LIGHTNING ROUND: NAVIGATING THE RAINBOW: UNPACKING SHARED EXPERIENCES & UNLOCKING
EMPOWERING SOLUTIONS FOR THE LGBTQ+ [.5 Ethics Credit; .5 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Odyssey House

After attending this presentation, you will be able to:

  1. Outline some common challenges faced by LGBTQ+ populations which must be considered and addressed in behavioral health treatment. This may include but not be limited to, housing, treatment placement/housing at various levels of care, healthcare access, gender affirming care, advocacy and legal restrictions/protections, transitions in treatment, justice system issues, and family dynamics; and,
  2. Gather an appropriate treatment team, design, and apply a thorough treatment plan which addresses these issues.
JUSTICE & RECIDIVISM CONSIDERATIONS WHEN THERE IS BRAIN INJURY

Ian Robertson, BS; Finian Keleher, PhD Student; Leana Gustafason; Joseph Kamerath, MD; Eric Hutchings, MIAGE

As a result of participating in this panel presentation, you will have information to be able to:

  1. TBA
  2. TBA
TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: STATE OF THE SCIENCE IN RECOVERY & TREATMENT

Christine Mullen, PsyD; Lisa White, BA

Head injury remains one of the most common causes of death and disability within the United States. This presentation is intended to highlight the historical and current patterns of the causes of traumatic brain injury. The typical recovery course, co-morbidities, persistent symptoms, treatment pathways, and factors that may alter outcomes will be discussed. Finally, presenters will review traditional and innovative treatment options.

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Present common trends in causes, resulting co-morbidities and persistent symptoms in traumatic brain injury; then,
  2. Discuss current rehabilitative interventions and treatment pathways for individuals with traumatic brain injury.
HARM REDUCTION & MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT: BARRIERS, TRENDS & BEST PRACTICES [1.0 Ethics Credit]

Krista Byrd, MSPAS, PA-C; Ivana Micic, LCSW; Bret Whiting, CPSS

Once you have attended this session, you will be able to:

  1. Present and discuss harm reduction practices within the Opioid Treatment model of care; and,
  2. Explain how integrated care addresses mental health, primary care, and substance use disorder needs in the Harm Reduction population.
EXPERIENTIAL ESCAPE: BREATH OF SERENITY – HOW TO COPE WITH STRESS & ANXIETY & RETURN
TO YOUR CALM STATE [Not Available Virtually]

Marina Romanov, MBA

After experiencing the breathwork modality, you will leave able to:

  1. Describe the personal impact of breathwork on themselves; and,
  2. Demonstrate some of the common breathwork techniques they can implement in their own practice as an appropriate adjunct to treatment for various clients.
EXHIBITS & BREAK (2:30 - 2:45)

CONCURRENT SESSIONS (2:45 – 3:45) (1 Hr/Each)

ALCOHOL - THE FORGOTTEN KILLER DRUG

B. Todd Thatcher, DO, CMRO

Alcohol is a killer prematurely ending the lives of over 100,000 Americans every year. And yet, only about 10% of Americans with an alcohol use problem get the help they need. In this presentation Dr. Thatcher intends to blatantly and bluntly shock providers of all skill levels out of our complacency and indifference. You’ll learn the basic biochemistry of alcohol, how it damages the body and brain, hurts our society by creating innocent trauma victims, and how you can start making a difference to reduce this national disaster and be a change agent for good.

After hearing the facts and ideas in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Trace the research and changing science behind alcohol use on biology, cognition, and overall health; and,
  2. Recognize and assess alcohol use in clients presenting with other mental health or addiction disorders and include appropriate actions for prevention through to tertiary intervention and recovery and wellness in the treatment plan.
TRENDS TO TRANSFORMATIONS: WHAT’S NEXT IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH RESEARCH THAT WILL
CHANGE YOUR PRACTICE? [.25 Ethics Credit]

Deborah Yurgelun-Todd, PhD

The presentation will include an overview of mental health research currently being conducted at the HMHI. It will summarize why this work is important and the potential imolcarions.

Once you participate in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Outline and describe some of the most current research in behavioral health arenas as well as the future projections; and,
  2. Show how this research may translate into clinical practice.
DBT: FROM NOVICE TO NINJA [Not Available Virtually]

Dereck Gonzalez, CSWI

You’re already heard about DBT. Does it sound like another acronym for you to remember?  Or maybe it’s one of those modalities that you vaguely remember scratching the surface of from your grad school days? In this breakout session, you’ll get to step into the “DBT Dojo” where you’ll get some concrete practice with select skills from the four pillars of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, that hold value for the clients you work with that struggle the most with issues ranging from dysregulation dysfunction. More importantly, you’ll also be able to learn to recognize the ways you can take the DBT approach with your challenging clients and identify how to lean into practicing this modality in ways that suit your own strengths as a clinician!

Once you have attended this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Identify clients who may be most appropriate and benefit from DBT Interventions – including more complex cases; and,
  2. Demonstrate DBT skills which are beyond the basics and can be adapted to use with individuals who have more complex clinical presentations.
BREAKING FREE, STAYING FREE: SUSTAINABLE BEHAVIOR STRATEGIES FOR THRIVING OUTSIDE THE SYSTEM

Frederick (Erick) Danneman, CMHC

Once you have attended this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Assess and work with individuals whose behavior has created problematic issues in their lives - from relationships to justice consequences; and,
  2. Implement treatment and education strategies to help individuals recognize their negative and consequential behaviors, their etiology and consequences to then change these 'habits' into permanent and positive behavior changes to improve their lives and help them stay out of justice systems.
ACCEPTANCE & COMMITMENT THERAPY: ADAPTING THE HEXAFLEX FOR GROUP THERAPY

Kendell Passey, LCSW; Jessie Wright, LCSW

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy has become a solid, evidence-based practice for a multitude of different mental heath disorders. The flexibility of this modality also allows for it to easily adapt from individual to group therapy. This presentation will follow the ACT Hexaflex and present easy tips, practical tools, and experiential processes for using ACT in group therapy.

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Utilize the Hexaflex from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) as a framework for group and individual treatment settings; and,
  2. Apply these and other tools to demonstrate the components of the Hexaflex and build psychological flexibility in clients.
OPLR & BEYOND [.5 Ethics Credit]

Jeff Shumway, BS; Nanci Klein, PhD

Once you have attended this session, you will be able to:

  1. Outline and discuss some of the key points and recommendations of OPLR’s studies used to propose legislative and practice changes impacting behavioral health in Utah; and,
  2. Outline and discuss some of the factors affecting this behavioral health system and professional practices which may not have been considered or addressed in those studies and how core practice values and ethics may or may not be affected.
BEYOND THE BUZZWORDS: SEX & LABOR TRAFFICKING – WHAT ARE THEY & ARE THEY IN YOUR PRACTICE?

Lindsay Gezinski, PhD; Annie Isabel Fukushima, PhD

Human trafficking, encompassing both labor and sex trafficking, is a pervasive global issue with profound health and mental health implications for survivors. Through a comprehensive overview, attendees will gain insights into the multifaceted nature of human trafficking, including its prevalence and evolving trends. By examining the intersections of vulnerability, exploitation, and coercion, attendees will develop a deeper understanding of the complex dynamics at play. This presentation aims to equip health and mental health professionals with knowledge and tools to effectively assess for human trafficking. Attendees will learn how to identify red flags, initiate sensitive conversations, and connect survivors with appropriate resources. By the end of the presentation, attendees will be better equipped to play a critical role in combating human trafficking, providing the essential support to survivors and contributing to broader efforts aimed at prevention and intervention.

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Debunk misinformation about human trafficking, describe the current state and trends of trafficking; and,
  2. Share basic tools to assess for human trafficking and provide a framework for supporting survivors.
STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING RECIDIVISM

Robert D. Simonsen, LCSW

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. TBA
  2. TBA
HELP AT THE POINT OF NEED: SINGLE-SESSION THERAPY

Teresa Lopez, LCSW

SST refers to a planned single-session intervention that might be scheduled or offered via a walk-in clinic, with no previous or subsequent sessions.

Research from Hoyt et al (2018) and Talmon (1990) suggests that since most people only attend one session, the therapist and client should approach each session as if it were going to be their last. It is not a one-off therapy but rather a structured first session which attempts to maximize the client’s first clinical encounter, understanding that it might be the only appointment the client chooses to attend, while entertaining the possibility of ongoing work. In the UK they term this one-at-a-time-therapy (OAATT).

The consequence of SST is that it brings down waiting lists and reduces waiting time for appointments, but that is not the purpose of using this modality. The most common number of sessions a client completes in therapy is one, and even a single brief encounter can be therapeutic. Single session therapy is a model of service delivery that endeavors to help the client at the point of need: a single session for those who would prefer, and more help available if requested. This presentation aims to introduce the research and practice supporting this model, to better equip you with the skills and tools to help our clients based on need, rather than clinician availability.

More specifically, after this session, you will be able to:

  1. Articulate the principles that inform the Single-Session Therapy (SST) mindset and the practice that flows from this way of thinking and respond to common misconceptions about it; and,
  2. Discuss the issues which must be considered when integrating SST into individual and agency therapy services and show how SST can incorporate concepts from other approaches.
MOVIE & RAP: LIFE ON THE PSYCH WARD: SHOULD OFFENDERS BE ALLOWED BACK IN SOCIETY [Not Available Virtually]

This video follows three patients in the forensic unit at Bethlem Royal Hospital in the UK, all of whom have committed serious offenses and have a mental illness. Questions are raised as to what is stable enough to keep the community safe. Can we keep offenders for indeterminate terms? Do mentally ill offenders have a right to eventually be a part of society?

As a result of participating in this popular track session, you will be able to:

  1.  Identify the ethical dilemmas in keeping mentally ill inmates beyond their sentences or without chance of being released; and, 
  2.  Explore the benefit/risk ratios of protecting society and providing hope and treatment for mentally ill offenders.
EXHIBITS & BREAK (3:45 – 4:00)

CLOSING OPTIONS (4:00 – 5:00) (1.0 Hr/Each)

HOPE & DESPAIR: PERSPECTIVES FOR THERAPY & LIFE [0.5 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Matthew Draper, PhD; Madison Webster, BA

As therapists, we regularly encounter hope and despair in our personal lives as well as in our therapy practices. These experiences are often intertwined. In this presentation, we will discuss how therapists may inadvertently increase despair by unknowingly fighting it. We will share examples and methods of increasing acceptance, forgiveness, finding meaning in suffering, and mindfulness exercises that facilitate coping hopefully with despair.

As a result of joining this popularly requested speaker, individuals will be able to:

1) Demonstrate ways to accept suffering; and,

2) Teach mindfulness techniques that facilitate hope.

THE RESILIENCY BHOW TO MAXIMIZE THE RESILIENCE YOU ALREADY HAVE

Christian Moore

The breakthrough idea of this presentation is that resilience can be taught. In fact, it's something we are all born with - from the homeless person on the street to the brightest Harvard professor. Most of us just haven't learned how to access what's already inside. In this presentation, participants will learn about the vital skill of resilience and will gain strategies to transform pain and adversity into fuel.

As a result of joining this popularly requested speaker, individuals will be able to:

1) TBD; and,

2) TBD

SEEING THE DIFFERENCE: OVERCOMING NARCISSISTIC INFLUENCES & EMBRACING
TOUCH LOVE

Hans R. Watson, DO

Once you have heard from this expert, you will leave able to:

1) Demonstrate ways to overcome narcissistic influences in one’s own life, recognize and accept those giving ‘touch love’ or productive feedback, and differentiate the two; and,

2) Assist clients to see these different influences in their own lives and to accept the positive influences while building appropriate boundaries to block the negative.

WHY THERAPISTS NEED HEALING TOO [.25 Ethics Credit]

Cheyenne Jones, LCSW

In this presentation you will gain insight into how your own life as a therapist / practitioner affects how you show up for your patients and clients. This is useful for all levels of practice (beginners, intermediates, advanced). This will discuss specific ways that you can gain greater self-awareness as professionals in sessions, as well as self-reflection outside of your job. You will learn mindfulness techniques that can be used on yourself as well as with patients and clients. We will discuss the Ethical Dilemma of transference and counter transference in practice. There will be a handout with specific resources on how to do your own healing work.

After attending this session, you will leave the live conference able to:

1) Journal how your own wounds may affect you as a therapist and debate how your lack of resolution of your own wounds may create ethical dilemmas in practice; and,

2) Use helpful and practical methods to work on your own healing and delve into yourself on a deeper level

MEDICAID PRE-RELEASE COVERAGE FOR INCARCERATED INDIVIDUALS - IMPROVING CARE TRANSITIONS THROUGH RE-ENTRY

Jennifer Strohecker

After attending this session, you will leave the live conference able to:

1) Outline the federal requirements for a CMS 1115 Re-entry waiver and the status of Utah Medicaid in meeting these requirements; and,

2) List three Medicaid member outcomes of the 1115 re-entry waiver and justice involved work and define the rationale and requirements of a reinvestment plan.

Tuesday - May 7, 2024

EXHIBITS & BREAK (9:00)

EXHIBITS & BREAK (10:30)

LUNCH BAZAR & BREAK (12:00)

EXHIBITS & BREAK (2:30)

EXHIBITS & BREAK (3:45)