Agenda

Monday, MAY 6 - 2024

REGISTRATION, EXHIBITS & CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST (7:30 - 8:30)

WELCOME & ACCREDITATION ANNOUNCEMENTS (8:30 - 8:35)

Jason Hunziker, MD

KEYNOTE ADDRESS: PERMISSION TO FLOURISH™: THE POSITIVE PSYCHOTHERAPEUTIC ATTITUDE – LESSONS
LEARNED FROM HEALING BASE CAMPS FOR UKRAINIAN VICTIMS OF WAR 8:35 - 9:50 (1.25 Hrs)

Amit G. Oren, PhD

Based on the belief that humans can flourish even in dire circumstances, positive psychology’s PERMA+ Model of what makes life worth living was used to create a psychotherapy program for groups of Ukrainian refugees and Gold Star families at a healing base mountaineering camp in the Austrian Alps.
Instead of applying the traditional psychotherapeutic approach of uncovering, examining, diagnosing, and treating the participants for what was wrong with them, this nature-based program focused on discovering, illuminating and cultivating what was right with them. Adopting an overarching positive clinical attitude and embodying hope gave direction to the treatment and, ultimately, produced extraordinary results.
As a result of participating in this opening plenary, you will be able to:
1) Cultivate a powerful, positive psychotherapeutic attitude and approach; and,
2) Adopt this perspective to enable you to engage individuals, couples, families, and groups in a transformative journey from a life of languishing to a life of flourishing.

EXHIBITS & BREAK (9:50 - 10:00)

CONCURRENT SESSIONS (10:00 - 11:15) (1.25 Hrs/Each)

NURTURING HEALING: INTEGRATING TRAUMA-INFORMED PRINCIPLES INTO DIRECT CLIENT SERVICES

Emily Bennett, LCSW

The landscape of trauma treatment has evolved significantly with the widespread adoption of evidence-based, trauma-specific clinical modalities such as EMDR, TFCBT, CPT, Exposure Therapy, Narrative Therapy, and more. While these approaches offer invaluable support to clients with a history of trauma, the integration of trauma-informed principles extends far beyond targeted interventions. It forms a foundational framework for holistic clinical practice, fostering healing and empowerment for all clients, irrespective of their background or presenting concerns. In this presentation, we delve into the six key principles of trauma-informed care, exploring how they can be seamlessly integrated into direct client services. Emphasizing the creation of safe and supportive environments, our discussion aims to complement and enhance the effectiveness of specific treatment modalities. Participants will gain insight into recognizing signs of trauma, responding sensitively to individual needs, and fostering environments that prevent re-traumatization, ultimately promoting healing and resilience.

As a result of attending this session, you will be able to:

  1. List the six key principles of a trauma informed approach and how they can be applied organizationally and individually in clinical practice. Recognize the neurobiology of trauma and its potential impact on client skills and abilities; then,
  2. List ways that TI principles can be applied to functions such as: the intake process, billing, scheduling.
UTAH THRIVING: CHAMPIONING THE WELL-BEING OF UTAHNS BY MEETING PEOPLE WHERE THEY ARE [1.25 Ethics Credit]

Miguel Trujillo, LCSW, PhD; Nubia Pena; Claudia Loayza, MCMP

As we engage in an internal and external assessment of how we do business, there is value in considering the changing needs of our workforce and constituents by creating systems and processes that prioritize, invest in and cultivate the potential to thrive in our state. This session will explore the Utah Thriving framework that informs our mission and manner in which we serve, influences our engagement practices that meet people where they are, and consistently reminds us of the power of beginning with what is strong and resilient in the community.

As a result of participating in this session, you will leave able to:

  1. Describe the principles of the Utah Thriving Framework. List community asset-based approaches in meeting communities' needs; and,
  2. Explore an engagement framework that encourages ways to creatively recognize strengths and local impact.
MORE THAN JUST WORRY: A DEEP DIVE INTO ANXIETY & EVIDENCE-BASED SOLUTIONS

Madison Harper, CMHC

This session, like the title suggests, will explore the multifaceted nature of anxiety, going beyond the common perception of it as mere worry. The presentation will delve into the various dimensions of anxiety, including its psychological, physiological, and social aspects. It will provide insights into the causes and triggers of anxiety, shedding light on its impact on mental well-being.

Moreover, the presentation will include and emphasize evidence-based solutions, suggesting practical and scientifically supported approaches to address anxiety. This may involve discussing therapeutic techniques, coping strategies, and interventions rooted in research and clinical practices. You can anticipate gaining a more in-depth understanding of anxiety and acquiring actionable insights to navigate and manage anxiety effectively in their personal and professional lives.After the conclusion of this breakout session, you will be able to:

  1. Provide a differential diagnosis of the various types of anxiety and outline the evidence-based practices currently believed to be most effective for these disorders; and,
  2. Demonstrate specific skills included in these treatment modalities including the use of distress tolerance as one intervention.
USING MOTIVATIONAL INTERVIEWING WITH RESISTIVE PATIENTS

Michael L. Gaziano, LCSW

Once you have heard from this national expert, you’ll be able to:

  1. Demonstrate more advanced Motivational Interviewing (MI) skills for various clients; and,
  2. Adapt MI techniques for effective implementation in diverse populations, in various settings, and with clients who have differing family support/involvement.
THE PSYCHEDELIC EXPERIENCE: NAVIGATING HISTORY, SCIENCE AND SOCIETY [1.0 Ethics Credit]

Wendy A. Johnson, PMHNP-BC

We will journey through the fascinating history of psychedelics including ancient use and practices, the counterculture movement of the 60's and current use and application. We will then briefly touch on the pharmacological mechanisms of key substances like psilocybin, LSD and MDMA before moving into current research for the treatment of mental illness. We will also cover legal, safety and ethical considerations and challenges. If time allows, we will end with speculations for the future of psychedelics. Appropriate for all attendees.

After attending this presentation, you will be able to:

  1. Report on some of the current research on psychedelics and trace the use of such substances from indigenous cultures to current day; and,
  2. Explore the current trends and interest around psychedelics and their current and future transitions into therapeutic practices along with important considerations such as appropriate use, legislative directions, ethical considerations, and specific nuances with some of the substances.
GENERATIVITY VS STAGNATION: THE ETHICS, ART, AND NEW SCIENCE OF BECOMING BETTER THERAPISTS
[1.25 Ethics Credit]

Ashley Greenwell, PhD

Access shortages and increased system demands are fueling the search for more efficient selection, training, and support practices to promote highly effective therapy. Most clients and fellow therapists have a sense that some clinicians are simply more adept than others, but how does that come to be? What therapeutic traits are inherent to us vs deliberately cultivated skills honed across the career? Unlike many other disciplines, for psychotherapists, additional experience does not necessarily translate into improved patient outcomes. This talk reviews the latest research, ethics, and core processes for enriching and sustaining therapists’ capacity to intervene more skillfully.  It will offer practical strategies for both therapists and supervisors to not only foster their own effectiveness but also their sense of fulfillment across the stages of a career.

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Delineate the role of therapists’ effects on their clients’ overall improvement; and,
  2. Describe several processes that can facilitate or hinder a therapists’ professional development across their career.
BEYOND THE SILVER STEREOTYPES: WORKING WISELY WITH OLDER ADULTS [.5 Ethics Credit] [Not Available Virtually]

Pending final confirmation

Once you have attended this session, you will leave able to:

  1. Explore some of the common myths and misconceptions around older adults and incorporate practices which are not influenced by these and, in fact, delve into the special needs and considerations of this population when treating them in a behavioral health and/or medical practice; and,
  2. Uncover some of the ethical challenges that ageism, health equity and parody can present to providers working with older adults and develop your own practices to combat any negative effects of these.
YOUR PART IN WORKING WITH THE TEAM TO BUILD SAFETY, HOPE & HEALING IN DOMESTIC VIOLENCE – PART 1
[.5 Ethics Credit; .25 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Christine Mullen, PsyD; Susan Griffith, JD; Annika K. Hunt, LCSW; Audrey Jiricko, MD; Mindy Maude; Lisa Wilde

As a result of participating in this session, you will leave able to:

  1. Identify and screen for domestic violence/interpersonal abuse in all ages, stages, and populations and address the cultural factors which can impact the risk and course of such occurrences; and,
  2. Outline the roles of behavioral health, law enforcement, and judicial professionals and how they can best interact to provide safety, support, and healing for victims, families, and others touched by this phenomenon.
EXPERIENTIAL ESCAPE: UNLEASH YOUR INNER HEALER: DISCOVER THE HEALING POWER OF MUSIC
THERAPY [Not Available Virtually]

Jaycie Voorhees, MM, MT-BC, SCMT; Allison Stratman MT-BC, SCMT, NMT; Berlin Edwards MM, MT-BC, SCMT

This presentation will provide listeners with an overview of music therapy within mental health, as well as common interventions utilizes to target varying goals. Listeners will also be invited to participate in different music experiences where the presenters will shed a light into what music therapy looks like in the treatment room. Listeners should be prepared to fully immerse themselves into the world of music and see first-hand the healing power it brings!

Once you ‘experience’ what this session offers, you will leave able to:

    1. Describe the personal impact of music therapy techniques on you; and,
    2. Demonstrate some of the common music therapy techniques you can implement in your own practice as an appropriate adjunct to treatment for various clients.
EXHIBITS & BREAK (11:15 – 11:30)

CONCURRENT SESSIONS (11:30 – 12:45) (1.25 Hrs/Each)

NAVIGATING LICENSING & SUPERVISION LAW CHANGES IN UTAH [0.5 Ethics Hours)

Jennifer Morgan-Smith, LMFT, MBA; John Robbins, PhD

This presentation will address the recent Utah law changes as defined in 58-60 Mental Health Professional Practice Act. The focus will be on licensing requirements and supervision requirements. The presenters will also speak to the rules that have been created by DOPL to further clarify the new laws.

Once you have heard this session, you will be able to:

  1. Outline the new (2024) legislative changes for behavioral health professionals around supervision and take the steps to stay in compliance; then,
  2. Provide an overview of supervision, its benefits, general skill directions, and place in quality care, et cetera.
YOUR NERVOUS SYSTEM ON PARENTHOOD: THE WILD RIDE FROM CONCEPTION TO POSTPARTUM FOR
BOTH PARTNERS [Not Available Virtually]

Laura Parry, LCSW, PMH-C

The perinatal period can be one of the high highs and very low lows. This presentation will highlight some typical worries, problems, and concurrent mental health issues that commonly arise in mothers and fathers during pregnancy and beyond. Additionally, we will identify, evaluate, and tackle these concerns to foster positive experiences and a smooth transition to parenthood.

After joining this expert, you will be able to:

  1. Outline some of the common concerns, issues, and co-existing mental health challenges which often occur in moms and dads in the perinatal periods; and,
  2. Recognize, assess, and address these issues to create more positive experiences and transitions and prevent negative sequela.
HEALTHY LIVING FOR YOUR BRAIN AND BODY: TIPS FROM THE LATEST RESEARCH

Raven Albertson, MA, CHES

Join us to learn about the latest research providing insights into how to make lifestyle choices that may help you keep your brain and body healthy as you age, and use hands-on tolls to help you incorporate these recommendations into a plan for healthy aging. We will cover topics such as diet and nutrition, exercise, social engagement, mental health, and cognitive activity.

Upon completion of this session, you will be able to:

  1. Utilize SMART goals to address holistic areas of health and well-being related to aging and cognitive health; and,
  2. Recognize and modify risk factors related to cognitive health and assist clients to do the same based upon the most current research.
ALTERNATIVE TREATMENTS FOR SEVERE DEPRESSION [.25 Ethics Credit]

Wilbur R. Dattilo, MD

This presentation about alternative, procedurally based, treatments for depression including ECT (electroconvulsive therapy), TMS (Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation), and Ketamine Treatments, mainly, because these are the modalities with which I am most familiar. I may include very brief descriptions of other modalities such as neurosurgical, ultrasound, and psychedelic approaches.

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Trace the various treatment modalities commonly used for mood disorders – including their indications, expected outcomes, red flags, contraindications, mechanism of action, et cetera; and,
  2. Outline some of the newer modalities in use and/or in research for treatment resistant disorders. This shall include but not be limited to indications, expected outcomes, contraindications and red flags, proper and improper use, trends, roles of treatment team members, et cetera.
DIVERSION & COLLABORATION – PART 1: CREATIVE SOLUTIONS FOR COMPLEX CONCERNS

Nichole Cunha, LCSW; Cacilia Jensen, CSW

Oftentimes, mental health and law enforcement professionals view crisis scenarios through a "confinement lens", challenging least restrictive principles and limiting client stabilization and resilience with the perception that safe environments must involve locked doors and involuntary holds. This perspective is compounded by classifications of "mentally ill", "behavioral" or "criminal", resulting in siloed approaches to supporting shared clientele. Attendees will understand their role in challenging stigma in diversion work, supporting people in crisis through least restrictive principles and collaborative approaches.

Once you have attended this session, you will leave able to:

  1. Explore the commonalities between roles of law enforcement, legal defenders, treatment providers and how to de-silo interactions and community approaches, and; 
  2. Introduce the Receiving Center model as an example of a program that embodies least restrictive principles, coordinated care, and calls attendees to take action in their professional work.
PROVING OURSELVES WRONG: INTEGRATING VIOLENCE RISK ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES INTO TREATMENT PLANNING FOR HIGH-RISK CLIENTS

Jeff Haun, PsyD, PhD; Taylor Zadonowicz, PhD

Providing mental health treatment to persons who have a history of violent/aggressive behavior can be a stressful task for mental health professionals. This presentation aims to provide an overview of violence risk assessment and management principles. Emphasis will be placed on promoting best practices in identifying, prioritizing, and implementing relevant risk management strategies in treatment planning with persons with mental illness who have a history of aggressive/violent behaviors. We will discuss the nature and prevalence of the nexus between mental illness and violence risk, identify empirically grounded risk and protective factors, and offer recommendations for constructing defensible risk management plans.

As a result of participating in this session, you will leave able to:

  1. Articulate key findings from the empirical literature pertaining to major illnesses and violent behavior. Describe common risk assessment methodologies; and,
  2. Identify empirically supported violence risk and protective factors. Articulate best practice considerations in constructing and implementing violence risk management strategies in treatment planning.
YOUR PART IN WORKING WITH THE TEAM TO BUILD SAFETY, HOPE & HEALING IN DOMESTIC
VIOLENCE – PART 2 [.5 Ethics Credit; .25 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Christine Mullen, PsyD; Susan Griffith, JD; Annika K. Hunt, LCSW; Audrey Jiricko, MD; Mindy Maude; Lisa Wilde

After joining this panel, you will leave able to:

  1. Identify and screen for domestic violence/interpersonal abuse in all ages, stages, and populations and address the cultural factors which can impact the risk and course of such occurrences; and,
  2. Outline the roles of behavioral health, law enforcement, and judicial professionals and how they can best interact to provide safety, support, and healing for victims, families, and others touched by this phenomenon.
FENTANYL & CURRENT DRUG TRENDS [Not Available Virtually]

Brent Wood

This presentation will discuss fentanyl, fentanyl analogs, and the current trends with this drug. We will look at counterfeit and fake pills, milling operations, and the many forms fentanyl is now taking. We will discuss the current dangers and the endless list of drugs being added to fentanyl. We will talk about the aggressive influx of fentanyl by the Mexican Cartels. We will also talk about the dramatic decrease in worldwide heroin production. Finally, we will discuss naloxone and the different options law enforcement uses.

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Discuss fentanyl, fentanyl analogs, current trends regarding this drug including counterfeit/fake pills, milling operations, other drugs of misuse, naloxone, and other naloxone options; and,
  2. Recognize opioid users and explore their many reasons for overdose on these pharmacologic agents.
LUNCHEON (12:45 - 1:45)

CONCURRENT SESSIONS (1:45 - 3:00) (1.25 Hrs/Each)

NOW THAT YOU HAVE THE 'TUDE', HERE ARE SOME TOOLS

Amit G. Oren, PhD

While maintaining a positive psychotherapeutic attitude gives overall direction to the treatment, several evidence-based positive psychology interventions can be integrated into traditional treatment modalities as well. In this workshop, specific tools and interventions used at healing base camps for Ukrainian victims of war will be discussed. These include awe walks, gratitude journals, strength building, a ‘three good things’ exercise, and the cultivation of optimism.

To make for a richer experience, Dr. Oren encourages you to take the Character Strengths Survey at https://www.viacharacter.org/ if possible, prior to attending this session.

After attending this presentation, you will be able to:

As a result of participating in this session, individuals will be able to:

  1. Incorporate and apply simple yet powerful positive psychotherapeutic interventions in their work with individuals, couples, families, and groups to promote healing and well-being.
  2. Assess the effectiveness of these interventions and adjust interventions accordingly.
TREATMENT OF PERINATAL MENTAL HEALTH DISORDERS: CONSIDERATIONS & CHALLENGES
[.75 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Jessica Allred, LCSW

This session will introduce and describe differential diagnosis of perinatal mental health disorders including perinatal anxiety, perinatal OCD, perinatal depression, perinatal PTSD, and perinatal psychosis. It will present the reasons for using the term Perinatal Mental Health Disorders (PMHD) instead of Postpartum Depression.  Physical, emotional, relational, and environmental factors that contribute to PMHD as well as the most evidence-based practices for each disorder will also be included.  Solution Focused therapy as it applies to PMHD, as well as proper and accurate assessment for a postpartum client will also add insights.

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Educate others about Perinatal Mental Health Disorders, recognize the symptoms, and provide a differential diagnosis; and,
  2. Treat, or refer to appropriate provider(s), individuals with PMHD – including but not limited to, care of the mother, support of the father and other family members, and safety of the newborn.
SUICIDE PREVENTION: RISK MANAGEMENT AND CLINICAL DOCUMENTATION CONSIDERATIONS [1.25 Suicide Prevention Credit, 1.25 Ethics Credit]

Rachael Jasperson, PhD, LCSW

This presentation will focus on risk management practices for the treatment of clients who may be experiencing suicidal ideation. Focus will be on understanding "standard of care" and evidence-based toll utilization. Additionally, the presenter will provide guidance on how to clearly document risk/protective factors and the clinical judgement behind the decision-making process.

After being in this session, you will be able to:

  1.  Identify 2-3 evidence-based tools used to assess and/or treat individual at risk for suicide; and
  2.  Summarize key elements in clinical documentation for effectively capturing suicide risk stratification and outlining the clinical judgement behind the decision-making process.
FROM CONFUSION TO CONNECTION: BUILDING BRIDGES OF UNDERSTANDING & DE-ESCALATING
CHALLENGING SITUATIONS WITH INIDIVDUALS WHO HAVE COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENTS

Liz Garcia-Leavitt, LCSW; Christine Marie Mullen, PsyD

Trace the etiology of escalated behaviors, including the potential triggers, in individuals with various cognitive impairments and brain injuries; then, Demonstrate techniques, including key communication components and styles, which help maintain calm and clear communication with said individuals as well as techniques which can help de-escalate these individuals once they have become more confused, angry, frightened, threatened, et cetera.

After attending this presentation, you will leave able to:

  1. Trace the etiology of escalated behaviors, including the potential triggers, in individuals with various cognitive impairments and brain injuries; then,
  2. Demonstrate techniques, including key communication components and styles, which help maintain calm and clear communication with said individuals as well as techniques which can de-escalate these individuals once they have become more confused, angry, frightened, threatened, et cetera.
DIVERSION & COLLABORATION – PART 2

Tom Ross; E. Robby Russo; Matt Dumont

This special panel presentation will include representatives from law enforcement, corrections, and behavioral health agencies (all from Salt Lake County) to discuss the collaboration needed to make receiving centers/diversion programs work. Because Salt Lake County has been engaging in ongoing discussions regarding the new Salt Lake County Receiving Center (Huntsman Mental Health Institute), we thought this might be an opportunity to have a conversation about how this type of collaboration can work. Essentially, from each perspective, we are interested in: what does collaboration look like? Where are the 'pain points'? Where is there alignment? What are the structural and resource barriers to such collaboration? The intent would be to characterize how agencies with overlapping interests, but different goals and tools at their disposal, can create processes for working collaboratively. We liked you as a moderator because of your experience working collaboratively to put a receiving center together in Davis County, your knowledge of areas where stakeholder interests converge and diverge, and your bird's eye view of the criminal justice system across the state. 

Once you have attended this session, you will leave able to:

  1. TBA
  2. TBA
ADDRESSING VIOLENCE WITHIN COMMUNITIES: EXPLORING COMMUNITY DRIVEN MULTI-SECTOR APPROACHES TO VIOLENCE PREVENTION

Mariah Cowell Mercier, MSW, PhD Candidate; Amber Lietz, BSW

Contact with the criminal legal system (CLS) has been associated with harmful outcomes to education, health, and economic mobility, on an individual, family, and community level. Recognizing these harms, it is critical to explore community-based violence interventions as a key leverage point to sustainable violence prevention and reducing an individual's contact with the criminal legal system (CLS). Exploring Community Violence Interventions (CVI) from a complex system intervention perspective both contributes to reinvesting in the community through both resources and collaboration and exploring alternatives to traditional CLS approaches. Comprehensive community-centered approaches are a promising alternative to interrupt the cyclical nature of exacerbated poverty, social immobility, and health inequalities. This panel will highlight the work of current Utah based community driven CVIs that incorporates public safety, public health, individual services, and community protective factors to build community capacity.

After attending this presentation, you will be able to:

  1. Portray interdisciplinary perspectives and theoretical frameworks for community violence – from prevention to justice and post-justice and treatment interventions; and,
  2. Present the Community Violence Project in Utah and identify the effective and non-effective components to combat violence at all levels and recognize ‘red flags’ of violent behaviors/action in clients and take early steps to reduce or eliminate their acting out
UNLOCKING THE MYSTERIES OF CIVIL COMMITMENT: PINK SHEETS, BLUE SHEETS, INVOLUNTARY
HOLDS, ETHICS & MORE [.75 Ethics Credit] [Not Available Virtually]

Melissa Proctor, CMHC, DE

Civil Commitment often seems to be the answer to mental health providers’ most difficult patients. Join this speaker to discover the facts of civil commitment, the legal requirements and what resources and treatments are really a part of civil commitment. Learn to ethically navigate the civil commitment processes and be better prepared to appropriately coordinate involuntary procedures with patients and their family members. This presentation primarily targets providers who have little or no training and experience with civil commitment processes and laws.

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Outline the civil commitment processes including the use of pink and blue sheets, legal criteria and ethics related to Civil Commitment laws; and,
  2. Explain the purpose of Civil Commitment and the responsibilities and obligations for civilly committed patients and the Local Mental Health Authority.
METHAMPHETAMINE & CURRENT DRUG TRENDS [Not Available Virtually]

Brent Wood

This presentation will discuss methamphetamine and the current trends with this drug. We will look at why meth is so popular and why there is a transition from opioid users to meth. We will look at the various forms in which methamphetamine is being transported and used to include the latest paraphernalia. We will also discuss the current changes in Mexican Cartel production of methamphetamine and how the new methamphetamine affects the users. Finally, we will look at the current trends used by the Mexican Carels and how that changes drug trafficking and use in our communities.

Once you participated in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Present the current trends around methamphetamine and their popularity as well as the current trends in meth production and the impact on users; and,
  2. List and describe the current trends used by Mexican Drug Trafficking Organizations and how that impacts drug trafficking and use among your patients.
EXHIBITS & BREAK (3:00 - 3:15)

CONCURRENT SESSIONS (3:15 - 4:45) (1.5 Hrs/Each)

TO FIDELITY & BEYOND: THE PITFALLS & PROMISES OF USING AI TO IMPROVE CLINICAL QUALITY & CLIENT OUTCOMES [Not Available Virtually]

Darin Carver, LCSW

The behavioral health field is plagued by wide variability in the delivery of effective treatments. This results in mixed outcome improvement at best for clients served. Applications of artificial intelligence have been developed and are being used to improve clinician adherence to treatments proven to work. These applications show significant promise in supporting clinical work. Conversely, over-reliance on such tools may leave gaping holes in a clinician’s professional development and skill attainment. This workshop will highlight the promises and potential pitfalls of using a machine learning feedback system for clinicians.

Once you have attended this session, you’ll be able to:

  1. Explain why variability in the delivery of effective treatments remains the greatest threat to client outcome improvement; and,
  2. Recognize both the strengths and the limitations of AI as a quality assurance tool to improve consistency in the delivery of effective treatments.
ASSERTIVE COMMUNITY TREATMENT (ACT) WITH A FORENSIC POPULATION: DEVELOPMENT, CLINICAL PHILOSOPHY, CHALLENGES AND POLICY CONSIDERATIONS

Lindsay Bowton, LCSW

This presentation will discuss modifications needed to the traditional ACT model to accommodate individuals involved in the criminal justice system who have been evaluated as having medium or high criminogenic risk levels. Topics covered include the creation and development a forensic ACT team, recommended clinical strategies and evidence-based practices, challenges, including specific case examples, and finally, a discussion of broader policy considerations that could improve outcomes for this population.

After attending this session, you will be able to:

  1. Explain current best practices for providing ACT services to a forensic population; and, 
  2. Describe the most up-to-date therapeutic strategies to use with individuals who experience symptoms of psychosis. Describe the existing systemic barriers to success for this population.
UNLOCKING INNER STRENGTH: INTEGRATING SPIRITUALITY IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH [1.5 Ethics Credit]

Matthew Draper, PhD; Jamison Law, CMHC; Ayleen Lara

The religious and spiritual life of Americans is in a state of flux. On the one hand, those participating in religion intentionally receive both mental and physical health benefits. On the other hand, religious participation has steadily decreased in the country. The combination of these two indicates a need and hunger for greater spiritual connection without formal religious participation. In this presentation, we will demonstrate examples of how to bring greater spiritual awareness and connection into the psychotherapy process safely and ethically for clients who wish to explore this possibility safely.

After attending this presentation, you will be able to:

  1. Explore a client’s spirituality and related paths (i.e. faith transitions) and demonstrate how those nuances impact behavioral health according to the latest research; then,
  2. Harness those beliefs and inner strengths and ethically incorporate them into prevention and intervention programs and practices for various individuals.
SEEING THE HUMAN AND THE UNIFORM: SUICIDE PREVENTION CONSIDERATIONS FOR MILITARY PERSONNEL, VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES
[1.5 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Rachel Leibold, LCSW

Explore with us some of the unconscious biases of treating servicemember and Veteran populations, and bring to the forefront the simultaneous challenges that military families face! Active Duty Military, Reserve and National Guard members and Veterans all experience an increased risk for suicide and mental health crisis. We will investigate common roots, and risk and protective factors of Veteran and Military Suicide; and conduct a clinical drill down via the evidence-based framework VA SAVE including review of appropriate suicide assessment and evaluation tools. We will also provide considerations for intervention and treatment of servicemembers, veterans, and their families including effective resources. This presentation is appropriate for new community providers, intermediate learners, and advanced clinical behavioral health professionals.

After attending this presentation, you will be able to:

  1. Outline some of the suicide prevention screening and assessment tools used in the VA system along with the ‘warm hand-offs’ and other system supports; and,
  2. Discuss some of the special considerations clinicians should incorporate into their approaches and suicide prevention interventions with vets and military personnel and families.
SUPPORTING THE WELLBEING OF DEMENTIA CAREGIVERS

Raven Albertson, MA, CHES

Review facts and figures that demonstrate a significant increase in prevalence of depression, anxiety, and other mental health challenges. Receive a toolkit to help to better support dementia caregivers in practice and connect caregivers with supportive services.

Upon leaving this session, you will be able to:

  1. Trace the development of common health issues caregivers often face including but not limited to mental health issues, stress-related disorders, and self-care neglect; and,
  2. Work with caregivers to prevent negative sequela from their caregiving role(s) by educating them on pertinent issues, helping them develop effective routines, recognizing burnout and other issues early to seek appropriate interventions. Other education and support will also be offered.
WHERE TO GO: REENTERING SOCIETY FOLLOWING FELONY CONVICTIONS [0.25 Ethics Credit]

Lena Gustafson, PhD; Dave Durocher; Katie Bennett, AD; Ricky Zazueta, Chef/CPT; Ann Coburn, SUDC

Once you have attended this session, you will be able to:

  1. Trace the paths to placement after a felony conviction and show how perceptions of labels (i.e. mental health disorder vs aggression) can impact placement and interventions; and,
  2. Outline and explain the applications of, and anticipated outcomes of, Forensic ACT Teams, trauma-Informed Care, and other models in justice and mental health settings.
IT’S NOT ‘ALL IN YOUR HEAD’ – RECONSIDERING CONCURRENT PSYCH SYMPTOMS WITH CHRONIC ILLNESSES

Paige Zuckerman, CMHC; Brayden Yellman, MD

We will address the unravelling of confusing diagnostic and treatment processes for individuals with chronic illnesses also presenting with mental health concerns. We will consider, unpack, and address the healthcare system root causes for clinician’s challenges in differential diagnosis and working with other treatment professionals collaboratively to offer best care for complex clients.

After attending this presentation, you will be able to:

  1. Recognize when a behavioral health client may have an intersecting medical diagnosis (inc. cognitive issues such as TBIs) and work with a medical provider for a complete, differential diagnosis of both issues; and,
  2. Design and apply a treatment plan which addresses both issues and work with the medical provider(s) to track, assess, and adjust treatment directions as may be appropriate.
GENDER MATTERS IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH TREATMENT: AN IN-DEPTH LOOK AT THE WOMEN’S RISK NEEDS
ASSESSMENT (WRNA) [1.5 Ethics Credit]

Emily J. Salisbury, PhD

Substance Use Disorder is a primary risk factor for women’s involvement in the criminal justice system. Decades of research demonstrates that girls’ and women’s onset to substance use addiction and pathways to criminal contact frequently have important distinctions when compared to boys and men. For instance, relational violations and trauma are more prevalent in the lives of substance-using women who are justice involved. Further, SAMHSA recommends that substance use interventions be gender-responsive and trauma-informed for women clients.

This presentation will focus on the principles of gender-responsive strategies, and the importance of assessing and treating women for their specific addiction and criminogenic needs. You will be provided with sections of the Women’s Risk Needs Assessment (WRNA), which is the only validated, peer-reviewed risk/need/strength assessment instrument specifically designed to predict women’s justice-involvement and address their unique psychosocial needs and strengths (e.g., unhealthy intimate relationships, trauma/victimization, PTSD, unsafe housing, parental stress, self-efficacy, etc.). In 2020, the WRNA was endorsed by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime to adhere to the UN’s Bangkok Rules, which are minimum standards of treatment for incarcerated and non-custodial women. The workshop will discuss the development of the WRNA and the ways in which it can assist substance use service providers to improve outcomes for women; highlight the various gender-responsive scales incorporated within the tool; identify research efforts investigating the utility of the instrument in various settings (i.e., mental health courts, probation/parole supervision, non-profit service delivery); and emphasize the challenges that emerge before, during, and after adoption. Learning opportunities will be provided to discuss how to being pursuing gender-responsive supervision and treatment strategies, as well as how to sustain the efforts long-term.

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Present the purpose of the WRNA and how it can help improve outcomes for the women they serve; and,
  2. Evaluate whether the WRNA, and more broadly, gender-responsive treatment strategies, might be right for their agency.
MOVIE & RAP: FATAL FLAWS: LEGALIZING ASSISTED DEATH [1.5 Ethics Credit] [Not Available Virtually]

Summit Community Counseling

This documentary provides a critical look at allowing terminally ill patients to take their own lives. It raises many ethical questions on both sides of the issue. Interviews and considerations are taken from the international community and here in the United States.

As a result of participating in this popular track session, you will be able to:

  1.  Identify the ethical issues in assisted suicide; and, 
  2.  Identify ethical obligations in addressing assisted suicide issues.

Tuesday, MAY 7 - 2024

CHECK-IN, EXHIBITS & CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST (7:30 - 8:00)

PLENARY: THE POWER OF ‘I AM ENOUGH’: A GUIDE TO UNIQUENESS IN LIVED EXPERIENCE
STORIES [.25 Ethics Credit] 8:00 - 9:00 (1.0 Hr)

Marriam Oliver

“The Power of ‘I Am Enough’: A Guide to Uniqueness in Lived Stories’ is a transformative exploration of self-worth and individuality within the intricate navigation of life. My story hopes to illuminate the journey of embracing the mantra ‘I Am Enough’ as a catalyst for understanding and celebrating the distinctiveness of personal narratives. Through insightful reflections and practical wisdom, in hopes the audience gains greater understanding of lived experiences as an offering that each individual in the criminal justice is truly unique in their experience and ‘Enough’ to heal and conquer the things ahead by using a multiple of tools to address needs and strengths.

At the end of this special presentation, you will be able to:

  1. Trace the common path for individuals involved in both the behavioral health and justice systems to identify the gaps, strengths, and weaknesses of these systems individually and combined; and,
  2. Suggest ways to improve these systems and change the perspectives and interventions of the professionals in each system to ethically improve your daily practices and, ultimately, the short and long -term outcomes of clients.
EXHIBITS & BREAK (9:00 – 9:15)

CONCURRENT SESSIONS (9:15 - 10:30) (1.25 Hrs/Each)

15+ THINGS MILITARY VETERANS WANT YOU TO KNOW

Lisa D. Duckworth, MSML, SPHR

15+ Things Veterans Want You To Know, developed at the PsychArmor Institute, is the cornerstone course for military culture education and was created to help educate anyone who works with, lives with, or cares for our military service members, Veterans and their families. This special version of 15 Things, presented by Army Chaplain’s Assistant veteran, Lisa Duckworth, focuses on the most important factors for them to understand to provide outstanding care to our country’s Veterans. 15 Things is military culture in the form of a soldier’s stories brought to life (with lots of humor) and will change the way you interact with those who wear or once wore our country’s uniform.

This course will teach you 5 questions you should always ask veterans, 1 question you should never ask veterans, and 15 facts that will make you more culturally competent.

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Name three questions you should ask a Veteran to learn more about his/her experience in the military as well as the one question you should never ask; and,
  2. Explore some of the challenges faced by family members of miliary personnel.
ASAM EVOLUTION: EMBRACING THE FOURT EDITION IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH PRACTICE

Amy Buehler, LCSW

This training is for all experience levels of attendees. The purpose of this presentation is to explore why we use tools like the ASAM in practice, to identify and explain key changes and updates in the fourth edition of the ASAM Criteria and discuss strategies for implementing the use of the new criteria into our programs and practices.

As a result of hearing from this practitioner, you will be able to:

  1. Outline ASAM’s Updated Criteria and innovations in levels of care and continuum management; and,
  2. Meet challenges and successfully implement the 4TH addition of the ASAM Criteria.
PRACTICAL ACT THERAPY SKILLS WORKSHOP [Not Available Virtually]

Nate Hadley, PhD, LCSW

Improve your therapeutic practice effectiveness by learning practice skills based on the core principles of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). The workshop will involve hands-on, experiential learning, focusing on real-world applications and equipping mental health professionals with actionable skills to enhance client outcomes. From mindfulness techniques and values clarification to cognitive defusion and commitment strategies, this workshop is a practical guide for those seeking to integrate ACT skills seamlessly into their practice.

 More specifically, after this session, you will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate key therapeutic concepts of ACT therapy and show how they can be applied in clinical practice with their respective client populations; and,
  2. Demonstrate in-person practice ACT therapy skills and techniques that can be implemented in their clinical practice.
WHAT’S EATING YOU? USING DBT & ACT INTERVENTIONS TO TREAT EATING DISORDERS

Marie Meintanis, MEd, LCPC, C-DBT

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Recognize and provide a differential diagnosis of eating disorders in adult generations and show how they commonly present and evolve at various stages and ages; then,
  2. Discuss common etiological paths of eating disorders across family lines and discuss treatment options for various clients based upon history, development, presentation, status, et cetera
CULTURALLY RESPONSIVE APPROACHES & INTERVENTIONS FOR LGBTQ+ INDIVIDUALS
[1.25 Ethics Credit; .25 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Jules Martinez, LCSW, CPSS

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to;

  1. Outline and discuss the considerations of LGBTQ+ individuals in justice and treatment settings including, but not limited to, placement factors, safety measures, evidence-based practices, organization/system policy development, political climates, bouncing between gender-affirming care and non-gender affirming institutions; and,
  2. Take measures to implement ethically and legally compliant care in various settings and levels of care and advocate for this population around said issues, changing laws and social policies
THE USE OF SUPERVISION FEES IN PROBATION: A NATIONAL STUDY

Megan Foster, MSW

Community supervision fees are collected by agencies across the country to supplement strapped local and state budgets. The role of these fees play in agency budgets varies dramatically across jurisdictions. The Utah Criminal Justice Center (UCJC), in collaboration with the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) and the National Association of Probation Executives (NAPE), conducted interviews with probation executives across the U.S. to determine how fees drive agency budgets and how some states have moved away from the practice. The current presentation will provide an overview of how fees are used across the U.S., how policies affect agencies and staff, and how policies have changed in some states.

After attending this presentation, you will be able to:

  1. TBA
  2. TBA
UNVEILING THE HUMAN STORIES: JUSTICE & MENTAL HEALTH IN THE BEEHIVE STATE [Not Available Virtually]

Destiny Garcia; Brock M. Smith, CSW, SASUDC; Amy Daeschel, CASUDC; John Mike Mireles

Increasingly, practitioners and researchers have identified the limits of using recidivism, as characterized in criminal justice data, as the sole measure of success for the criminal justice system. In part, such measures tend to obfuscate the experience, including successes and hardships, of individuals as they seek to reintegrate after justice-system contact. The National Academies of Science have recently called for the criminal justice system to re-conceptualize its definition of post-release success to account for individual well-being, the criminalization of poverty and substance use, and the adequacy of social and material support. This panel will feature three formerly justice-involved individuals discussing their path to post-release success, including supports, barriers, and the criminal justice system's role in promoting and inhibiting outcomes.

Upon completion of this panel presentation, you will gleam information to:

  1. Characterize the experiences of individuals who have successfully exited the criminal or juvenile justice system, including those programs, services, or individuals that supported that transition; and,
  2. Identify the mechanisms through which the criminal justice and behavior health systems both support and interrupt efforts toward well-being and cessation of criminal behavior and brainstorm ideas for closing these gaps, improving services, and reducing recidivism.
THE MAGIC OF COLLECTIVE HEALING: DEMYSTIFYING GROUP THERAPY PRINCIPLES & PRACTICES [.25 Ethics Credit]

Hans R. Watson, DO

After leaving this popular speaker, you will be able to:

  1. Trace the practices of group therapy and teach others about the principles behind the practice; and,
  2. Desing a group therapy plan which incorporates the accepted and ethical principles and concepts which lead to its effectiveness.
FROM SELF-HARM TO SELF-COMPASSION: PRACTICAL CONSIDERATIONS & CHALLENGES IN WORKING WITH ADULTS THAT SELF-HARM [1.0 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Ashley Dahl, PsyD, LCPC

Once you attend this session, you will leave able to:

    1. Discuss the development of self-harm behaviors, identify signs and symptoms of self-harm, and explore unique challenges that may arise in clinical practice; and,
    2. Recognize and apply interventions and treatments that can help reduce self-harm behaviors with a special focus on how to tailor your approach with various clients.
EXHIBITS & BREAK (10:30 – 10:45)

CONCURRENT SESSIONS (10:45 – 12:00) (1.25 Hrs/Each)

LIGHTNING ROUND: UPDATED PTSD TREATMENT GUIDELINES, INNOVATIONS AND FUTURE DIRECTIONS [0.25 Suicide Prev. Credits]

Thomas Mullin, PhD; Sebastian Kreitschitz, MD, FAPA; Jonathan Codell, PhD; Jennifer Romesser, PsyD; Dianna Fuessel-Herrmann, BS; Lauren Thurgood, BS

The assessment and treatment of PTSD continues to evolve in the context of practice and research. This series of lightning round talks will survey the major changes in treatment practice guidelines for PTSD. This includes updates about first line and emerging treatments, including Models of Accelerated Service Delivery (MASD), medication management, and complementary and integrative interventions. This presentation will also include presentation of the emerging body of research for MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. Finally, the panel will talk about exciting new research that may usher in new and adapted treatments which include Stellate Ganglion Blocks (SGB) and a dismantling study of Cognitive Processing Therapy.

As a result of participating in this Lightning Round, you will be able to:

  1. Outline the recently updated evidence-based treatment guidelines for PTSD as documented in the VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guidelines, with an emphasis on first line treatments, and;
  2. Introduce updated practices of Models of Accelerated Service Delivery (MASD) for Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure Therapy for the treatment of PTSD.
UNLOCKING STRENGTH & UNITY IN THE AFTERMATH OF AN ORGANIZATIONAL TRAUMA [0.25 Suicide Prevention Hours]

Laura Bradbury, LCSW; Katherine P. Supiano, PhD, LCSW, F-GSA, FT, APHSW-C

Mental Health Clinicians practice in settings with vulnerable clients (risk of suicide death/overdose death/premature death) and may also be called upon to support community programs and services that are impacted by organizational trauma. In this session we will present best practices and practical approaches to addressing a variety of adverse workplace events, in both preventive and responsive ways that foster compassion and team support.

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Trace the development of some common occurrences in an organization and their staff following a trauma; and,
  2. Develop and implement plans in all departments of an organization to lessen the negative sequela of a trauma and best support all levels of employees and partners.
BEHIND THE MASK: UNDERSTANDING & ENGAGING INDIVIDUALS WITH ANTISOCIAL PERSONALITY DISORDER

Ashley C. T. Jones, PhD

Mental Health Clinicians practice in settings with vulnerable clients (risk of suicide death/overdose death/premature death) and may also be called upon to support community programs and services that are impacted by organizational trauma. In this session we will present best practices and practical approaches to addressing a variety of adverse workplace events, in both preventive and responsive ways that foster compassion and team support.

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Present the tools used for a differential diagnosis of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) and discuss the differences between similarly presenting disorders; and,
  2. Demonstrate some of the treatment modalities - pharm and non-pharm, and outline their expected outcomes, course of treatment, family support components, and other aspects.
DISMANTLING INJUSTICE: EXPLORING THE CRUCIAL NEXUS BETWEEN SYSTEMIC RACISM & BIAS
IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH TREATMENT [1.25 Ethics Credit]

Sherra’ Watkins, PhD, CMHC-S, LCAS, CCS, CRC, BC-TMH

Join us in this thought-provoking workshop as we delve into the intricate relationship between systemic racism and bias within the realm of behavioral health treatment. This session aims to unravel the complexities, foster awareness, and ignite conversations that contribute to positive change in the pursuit of equitable and unbiased healthcare practices. Engage in open dialogue with expert facilitators, sharing real-world scenarios to deepen your understanding of the challenges faced by marginalized communities in behavioral health settings. Walk away with practical insights and a commitment to contribute to a more just and compassionate future in behavioral healthcare.

 

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will leave able to:

  1. Trace the historical roots and structural foundations of systemic racism and bias in the context of behavioral health treatment and explore the intersections of race, bias, and systemic structures, emphasizing how they manifest in behavioral health settings and impact patient experiences; and,
  2. Implement strategies and tools to dismantle biases and promote inclusive, equitable, and culturally competent behavioral health treatment approaches.
CAN AN ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE BE USED TO TREAT A HUMAN MIND? [1.25 Ethics Credit]

Brandon Amacher

This presentation will cover the basics of Artificial Intelligence and discuss how AI is impacting mental health and how it can be used in the treatment of mental health. Additionally, ethical and security concerns surrounding AI will be discussed.

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Trace the various treatment modalities commonly used for mood disorders – including their indications, expected outcomes, red flags, contraindications, mechanism of action, et cetera; and,
  2. Outline some of the newer modalities in use and/or in research for treatment resistant disorders. This shall include but not be limited to indications, expected outcomes, contraindications and red flags, proper and improper use, trends, roles of treatment team members, et cetera.
ISOLATION & ITS IMPACTS ON THOSE WITH MENTAL HEALTH AND/OR ADDICTION ISSUES,
OLDER ADULTS, SMI, & OTHER POPULATIONS [Not Available Virtually]

Steven G. Sugden, MD, MPH, MSS

Recently, the U.S. Surgeon General brought attention to the impact of the epidemic of loneliness. This presentation will focus on the impact of loneliness on mental health, the neuroplastic sequelae, and potential solutions. The presentation is targeted for all participating.

 

Once you have attended this workshop, you will be able to:

1) Compare the positive and negative causes and consequences of isolation on various populations and cite research findings on this topic; and,

2) Address these issues (i.e. loss of support systems, loneliness and boredom triggers, and reduced access to resources) in the design of treatment plans at all levels of care

JUSTICE-INVOLVED ADULTS AS A VULNERABLE POPULATION – ENSURING ETHICAL
PRACTICE [1.25 Ethics Credit]

Jessica Seawright, CSW; Rhiannon McDaniel, CSW

Justice-involved adults are a vulnerable population that mental and behavioral health practitioners serve in a variety of systems. Working with this complex population offers a challenge to practitioners to understand and build competence to ensure we promote dignity and worth of the person, prioritize human relationships and promote social justice. This session will offer current research and practices to support your work with justice-involved adults, their families, and broader communities.

 

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

1) Conduct (or appropriately refer clients for) criminogenic risk assessments and use these results to design and implement ethically sound intervention plans; and,

2) Use this data, current research, and best practices to design programs and provide ethically sound services to justice-involved adults

DIVERSION & COLLABORATION: CREATIVE SOLUTIONS FOR COMPLEX CONCERNS

Nichole Cunha, LCSW

Often times, mental health and law enforcement professionals view crises scenarios through a "confinement lens"; challenging least restrictive principles and limiting client stabilization and resilience through the perception that safe environments must have locked doors or involuntary holds. This perspective is often compounded by classifications of "mentally ill", "behavioral" or "criminal", resulting in siloed approaches to supporting shared clientele. Attendees will understand their role in challenging stigma, supporting people in crisis through least restrictive principles, and apply knowledge to guide their treatment and community interactions.

As a result of joining this session, you will leave able to:

  1. Explore the commonalities between roles of law enforcement, legal defenders, and treatment providers and how to de-silo interactions through community-based approaches; and,
  2. Review the Receiving Center model as an example of a program that embodies least restrictive principles, coordinated care, and calls attendees to take action in their professional work.
FROM THEORY TO THERAPY – GROUPWORK IN ACTION [Not Available Virtually]

Hans R. Watson, DO

After attending this presentation, you will be able to:

1) Translate the principles and concepts of group therapy into practice and demonstrate their uses; and,

2) Evaluate a group therapy session and adjust its directions to be most effective for the various participants.

LUNCH FOODTRUCKS & FUN (12:00 - 1:15) on your own

(ON YOUR OWN)

CONCURRENT SESSIONS (1:15 - 2:30) (1.25 Hrs/Each)

UNRAVELING RESILIENCE: APPLYING POLYVAGAL TECHNIQUES IN TRAUMA INTERVENTION [Not Available Virtually]

Magenta Silberman

In this presentation, we will review the foundational concepts of polyvagal theory and explore practical applications of polyvagal techniques. By the end of this presentation, you will understand the polyvagal conceptualization of trauma responses and acquire techniques to integrate into your therapeutic practice.

Once you and others have attended this session, you will be able to:

  1. Assess individuals for trauma, trauma responses, and nervous system involvement; and,
  2. Apply trauma treatment using polyvagal theory and interventions and track process to adjust these interventions as needed for the most significant and long-term success.
LEGACIES OF TRAUMA & TRADITIONS OF RESILIENCE

Elizabeth A. Shelton, LCSW; Jerad Todacheenie, LCSW

This session will provide a brief introduction to epigenetics and generational trauma, the negative effects on populations, specifically Utah Native populations; and treatments that have shown promise in building resilience and reclaiming identify.

Once you have attended this session, you’ll be able to:

  1. Explain how generational trauma is forged through historical tragedy and current policy; then,
  2. Apply techniques to help individuals in mental health and justice settings with general trauma to build resilience through cultural identity and narrative.
HEALING THE HIDDEN WOUND: UNDERSTANDING & TREATING MORAL INJURY [.25 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Kent D. Hinkson Jr., PhD; Malisa M. Brooks, PhD

Join us for a discussion of the existing and emerging world of Moral Injury and the Potentially Morally Injurious Events (PMIEs) from which it often develops. First, a conversation around "What Moral Injury and how do we recognize it?" will be had, followed by a presentation on differential diagnosis, measurement, and treatment. Additionally, we'll talk about organization contexts from law enforcement and first responders, military personnel and veterans, and healthcare. Finally, much-needed attention will be spent on how you--as the clinician or provider--may be experiencing moral injury in your job.

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Recognize and provide a differential diagnosis and assessment of moral injuries in various individuals and recognize when your work circumstances in health and/or behavioral health care may have created the same issues; and,
  2. Apply the techniques and treatment modalities believed to be most effective for individuals with moral injury.
KETAMINE: HARNESSING POTENTIAL WHILE BALANCING RISK & REWARD [.25 Ethics Credit]

Wendy A. Johnson, PMHNP-BC

Beginning with an overview of ketamine’s medical history and its traditional use as an anesthetic, this lecture will then delve into the groundbreaking research and clinical trials that have uncovered the potential benefits of ketamine in treating mental health conditions such as depression, anxiety, and PTSD. Emphasis is placed on the delicate balance required to harness these benefits effectively while managing the associated risks.

Upon completion of this session, you will be able to:

  1. Provide a brief overview of ketamine, including its history and pharmacological mechanism; and,
  2. Examine current research demonstrating the therapeutic potential of ketamine in treating mental health conditions as well as discuss potential risks and side effects associated with ketamine use.
LIGHTNING ROUND: NAVIGATING THE RAINBOW: UNPACKING SHARED EXPERIENCES & UNLOCKING
EMPOWERING SOLUTIONS FOR THE LGBTQ+ [.5 Ethics Credit; .5 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Odyssey House

After attending this presentation, you will be able to:

  1. Outline some common challenges faced by LGBTQ+ populations which must be considered and addressed in behavioral health treatment. This may include but not be limited to, housing, treatment placement/housing at various levels of care, healthcare access, gender affirming care, advocacy and legal restrictions/protections, transitions in treatment, justice system issues, and family dynamics; and,
  2. Gather an appropriate treatment team, design, and apply a thorough treatment plan which addresses these issues.
JUSTICE & RECIDIVISM CONSIDERATIONS WHEN THERE IS BRAIN INJURY

Ian Robertson, BS; Finian Keleher, PhD Student; Leana Gustafason; Joseph Kamerath, MD; Eric Hutchings, MIAGE

As a result of participating in this panel presentation, you will have information to be able to:

  1. TBA
  2. TBA
TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: STATE OF THE SCIENCE IN RECOVERY & TREATMENT

Christine Mullen, PsyD; Lisa White, BA

Head injury remains one of the most common causes of death and disability within the United States. This presentation is intended to highlight the historical and current patterns of the causes of traumatic brain injury. The typical recovery course, co-morbidities, persistent symptoms, treatment pathways, and factors that may alter outcomes will be discussed. Finally, presenters will review traditional and innovative treatment options.

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Present common trends in causes, resulting co-morbidities and persistent symptoms in traumatic brain injury; then,
  2. Discuss current rehabilitative interventions and treatment pathways for individuals with traumatic brain injury.
HARM REDUCTION & MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT: BARRIERS, TRENDS & BEST PRACTICES [1.0 Ethics Credit]

Krista Byrd, MSPAS, PA-C; Ivana Micic, LCSW; Bret Whiting, CPSS

Once you have attended this session, you will be able to:

  1. Present and discuss harm reduction practices within the Opioid Treatment model of care; and,
  2. Explain how integrated care addresses mental health, primary care, and substance use disorder needs in the Harm Reduction population.
EXPERIENTIAL ESCAPE: BREATH OF SERENITY – HOW TO COPE WITH STRESS & ANXIETY & RETURN
TO YOUR CALM STATE [Not Available Virtually]

Marina Romanov, MBA

After experiencing the breathwork modality, you will leave able to:

  1. Describe the personal impact of breathwork on themselves; and,
  2. Demonstrate some of the common breathwork techniques they can implement in their own practice as an appropriate adjunct to treatment for various clients.
EXHIBITS & BREAK (2:30 - 2:45)

CONCURRENT SESSIONS (2:45 – 3:45) (1 Hr/Each)

ALCOHOL - THE FORGOTTEN KILLER DRUG

B. Todd Thatcher, DO, CMRO

Alcohol is a killer prematurely ending the lives of over 100,000 Americans every year. And yet, only about 10% of Americans with an alcohol use problem get the help they need. In this presentation Dr. Thatcher intends to blatantly and bluntly shock providers of all skill levels out of our complacency and indifference. You’ll learn the basic biochemistry of alcohol, how it damages the body and brain, hurts our society by creating innocent trauma victims, and how you can start making a difference to reduce this national disaster and be a change agent for good.

After hearing the facts and ideas in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Trace the research and changing science behind alcohol use on biology, cognition, and overall health; and,
  2. Recognize and assess alcohol use in clients presenting with other mental health or addiction disorders and include appropriate actions for prevention through to tertiary intervention and recovery and wellness in the treatment plan.
TRENDS TO TRANSFORMATIONS: WHAT’S NEXT IN BEHAVIORAL HEALTH RESEARCH THAT WILL
CHANGE YOUR PRACTICE? [.25 Ethics Credit]

Deborah Yurgelun-Todd, PhD

The presentation will include an overview of mental health research currently being conducted at the HMHI. It will summarize why this work is important and the potential imolcarions.

Once you participate in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Outline and describe some of the most current research in behavioral health arenas as well as the future projections; and,
  2. Show how this research may translate into clinical practice.
DBT: FROM NOVICE TO NINJA [Not Available Virtually]

Dereck Gonzalez, CSWI

You’re already heard about DBT. Does it sound like another acronym for you to remember?  Or maybe it’s one of those modalities that you vaguely remember scratching the surface of from your grad school days? In this breakout session, you’ll get to step into the “DBT Dojo” where you’ll get some concrete practice with select skills from the four pillars of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy, that hold value for the clients you work with that struggle the most with issues ranging from dysregulation dysfunction. More importantly, you’ll also be able to learn to recognize the ways you can take the DBT approach with your challenging clients and identify how to lean into practicing this modality in ways that suit your own strengths as a clinician!

Once you have attended this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Identify clients who may be most appropriate and benefit from DBT Interventions – including more complex cases; and,
  2. Demonstrate DBT skills which are beyond the basics and can be adapted to use with individuals who have more complex clinical presentations.
BREAKING FREE, STAYING FREE: SUSTAINABLE BEHAVIOR STRATEGIES FOR THRIVING OUTSIDE THE SYSTEM

Frederick (Erick) Danneman, CMHC

Once you have attended this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. Assess and work with individuals whose behavior has created problematic issues in their lives - from relationships to justice consequences; and,
  2. Implement treatment and education strategies to help individuals recognize their negative and consequential behaviors, their etiology and consequences to then change these 'habits' into permanent and positive behavior changes to improve their lives and help them stay out of justice systems.
ACCEPTANCE & COMMITMENT THERAPY: ADAPTING THE HEXAFLEX FOR GROUP THERAPY

Kendell Passey, LCSW; Jessie Wright, LCSW

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy has become a solid, evidence-based practice for a multitude of different mental heath disorders. The flexibility of this modality also allows for it to easily adapt from individual to group therapy. This presentation will follow the ACT Hexaflex and present easy tips, practical tools, and experiential processes for using ACT in group therapy.

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Utilize the Hexaflex from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) as a framework for group and individual treatment settings; and,
  2. Apply these and other tools to demonstrate the components of the Hexaflex and build psychological flexibility in clients.
OPLR & BEYOND [.5 Ethics Credit]

Jeff Shumway, BS; Nanci Klein, PhD

Once you have attended this session, you will be able to:

  1. Outline and discuss some of the key points and recommendations of OPLR’s studies used to propose legislative and practice changes impacting behavioral health in Utah; and,
  2. Outline and discuss some of the factors affecting this behavioral health system and professional practices which may not have been considered or addressed in those studies and how core practice values and ethics may or may not be affected.
BEYOND THE BUZZWORDS: SEX & LABOR TRAFFICKING – WHAT ARE THEY & ARE THEY IN YOUR PRACTICE?

Lindsay Gezinski, PhD; Annie Isabel Fukushima, PhD

Human trafficking, encompassing both labor and sex trafficking, is a pervasive global issue with profound health and mental health implications for survivors. Through a comprehensive overview, attendees will gain insights into the multifaceted nature of human trafficking, including its prevalence and evolving trends. By examining the intersections of vulnerability, exploitation, and coercion, attendees will develop a deeper understanding of the complex dynamics at play. This presentation aims to equip health and mental health professionals with knowledge and tools to effectively assess for human trafficking. Attendees will learn how to identify red flags, initiate sensitive conversations, and connect survivors with appropriate resources. By the end of the presentation, attendees will be better equipped to play a critical role in combating human trafficking, providing the essential support to survivors and contributing to broader efforts aimed at prevention and intervention.

As a result of participating in this session, you will be able to:

  1. Debunk misinformation about human trafficking, describe the current state and trends of trafficking; and,
  2. Share basic tools to assess for human trafficking and provide a framework for supporting survivors.
STRATEGIES FOR REDUCING RECIDIVISM

Robert D. Simonsen, LCSW

As a result of participating in this workshop, you will be able to:

  1. TBA
  2. TBA
HELP AT THE POINT OF NEED: SINGLE-SESSION THERAPY

Teresa Lopez, LCSW

SST refers to a planned single-session intervention that might be scheduled or offered via a walk-in clinic, with no previous or subsequent sessions.

Research from Hoyt et al (2018) and Talmon (1990) suggests that since most people only attend one session, the therapist and client should approach each session as if it were going to be their last. It is not a one-off therapy but rather a structured first session which attempts to maximize the client’s first clinical encounter, understanding that it might be the only appointment the client chooses to attend, while entertaining the possibility of ongoing work. In the UK they term this one-at-a-time-therapy (OAATT).

The consequence of SST is that it brings down waiting lists and reduces waiting time for appointments, but that is not the purpose of using this modality. The most common number of sessions a client completes in therapy is one, and even a single brief encounter can be therapeutic. Single session therapy is a model of service delivery that endeavors to help the client at the point of need: a single session for those who would prefer, and more help available if requested. This presentation aims to introduce the research and practice supporting this model, to better equip you with the skills and tools to help our clients based on need, rather than clinician availability.

More specifically, after this session, you will be able to:

  1. Articulate the principles that inform the Single-Session Therapy (SST) mindset and the practice that flows from this way of thinking and respond to common misconceptions about it; and,
  2. Discuss the issues which must be considered when integrating SST into individual and agency therapy services and show how SST can incorporate concepts from other approaches.
MOVIE & RAP: LIFE ON THE PSYCH WARD: SHOULD OFFENDERS BE ALLOWED BACK IN SOCIETY [Not Available Virtually]

This video follows three patients in the forensic unit at Bethlem Royal Hospital in the UK, all of whom have committed serious offenses and have a mental illness. Questions are raised as to what is stable enough to keep the community safe. Can we keep offenders for indeterminate terms? Do mentally ill offenders have a right to eventually be a part of society?

As a result of participating in this popular track session, you will be able to:

  1.  Identify the ethical dilemmas in keeping mentally ill inmates beyond their sentences or without chance of being released; and, 
  2.  Explore the benefit/risk ratios of protecting society and providing hope and treatment for mentally ill offenders.
EXHIBITS & BREAK (3:45 – 4:00)

CLOSING OPTIONS (4:00 – 5:00) (1.0 Hr/Each)

HOPE & DESPAIR: PERSPECTIVES FOR THERAPY & LIFE [0.5 Suicide Prevention Credit]

Matthew Draper, PhD; Madison Webster, BA

As therapists, we regularly encounter hope and despair in our personal lives as well as in our therapy practices. These experiences are often intertwined. In this presentation, we will discuss how therapists may inadvertently increase despair by unknowingly fighting it. We will share examples and methods of increasing acceptance, forgiveness, finding meaning in suffering, and mindfulness exercises that facilitate coping hopefully with despair.

As a result of joining this popularly requested speaker, individuals will be able to:

1) Demonstrate ways to accept suffering; and,

2) Teach mindfulness techniques that facilitate hope.

THE RESILIENCY BHOW TO MAXIMIZE THE RESILIENCE YOU ALREADY HAVE

Christian Moore

The breakthrough idea of this presentation is that resilience can be taught. In fact, it's something we are all born with - from the homeless person on the street to the brightest Harvard professor. Most of us just haven't learned how to access what's already inside. In this presentation, participants will learn about the vital skill of resilience and will gain strategies to transform pain and adversity into fuel.

As a result of joining this popularly requested speaker, individuals will be able to:

1) TBD; and,

2) TBD

SEEING THE DIFFERENCE: OVERCOMING NARCISSISTIC INFLUENCES & EMBRACING
TOUCH LOVE

Hans R. Watson, DO

Once you have heard from this expert, you will leave able to:

1) Demonstrate ways to overcome narcissistic influences in one’s own life, recognize and accept those giving ‘touch love’ or productive feedback, and differentiate the two; and,

2) Assist clients to see these different influences in their own lives and to accept the positive influences while building appropriate boundaries to block the negative.

WHY THERAPISTS NEED HEALING TOO [.25 Ethics Credit]

Cheyenne Jones, LCSW

In this presentation you will gain insight into how your own life as a therapist / practitioner affects how you show up for your patients and clients. This is useful for all levels of practice (beginners, intermediates, advanced). This will discuss specific ways that you can gain greater self-awareness as professionals in sessions, as well as self-reflection outside of your job. You will learn mindfulness techniques that can be used on yourself as well as with patients and clients. We will discuss the Ethical Dilemma of transference and counter transference in practice. There will be a handout with specific resources on how to do your own healing work.

After attending this session, you will leave the live conference able to:

1) Journal how your own wounds may affect you as a therapist and debate how your lack of resolution of your own wounds may create ethical dilemmas in practice; and,

2) Use helpful and practical methods to work on your own healing and delve into yourself on a deeper level

MEDICAID PRE-RELEASE COVERAGE FOR INCARCERATED INDIVIDUALS - IMPROVING CARE TRANSITIONS THROUGH RE-ENTRY

Jennifer Strohecker

After attending this session, you will leave the live conference able to:

1) Outline the federal requirements for a CMS 1115 Re-entry waiver and the status of Utah Medicaid in meeting these requirements; and,

2) List three Medicaid member outcomes of the 1115 re-entry waiver and justice involved work and define the rationale and requirements of a reinvestment plan.